Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Dec 2003
    • Posts: 514
    #1

    about strawberry

    1. Weight for weight, strawberries, raspberries and blackcurrants contain as much vitamin C as citrus fruits.

    2. Remove the calyx from strawberries, but remember there is no need to hull them when making juices.

    What does "weight for weight" mean?
    What does "hull" mean? Isn't hull the same part as calyx?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,833
    #2

    Re: about strawberry

    10g, say, of one fruit will have the same vitamin C as ten g of another.
    The calyx is the green leafy bit.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Dec 2003
    • Posts: 514
    #3

    Re: about strawberry

    The calyx is the green leafy bit.[/quote]

    So, when it says not to hull them, which part is it refering to?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,833
    #4

    Re: about strawberry

    I'd say that was the hard part of the centre, the white bit you might cut out if you're going to eat them not juice them.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Dec 2003
    • Posts: 514
    #5

    Re: about strawberry

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I'd say that was the hard part of the centre, the white bit you might cut out if you're going to eat them not juice them.
    I'm still a little confused. This is probably because I personally never take the white part off when I eat strawberries.
    So...as far as I understand, the sentence I quoted was saying that "When making strawberry juice, take the green leafy part and the green hard stalk away but keep the fruit flesh (including the red part and the white center) complete.
    Is this right?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,833
    #6

    Re: about strawberry

    That's how I read it. Like you, I eat the whole strawberry anyway.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #7

    Re: about strawberry

    Quote Originally Posted by Eway View Post
    I'm still a little confused. This is probably because I personally never take the white part off when I eat strawberries.
    So...as far as I understand, the sentence I quoted was saying that "When making strawberry juice, take the green leafy part and the green hard stalk away but keep the fruit flesh (including the red part and the white center) complete.
    Is this right?
    I'm confused too. According my dictionary, the calyx is the hull of the strawberry. Another definition of "hull" would be the outer covering. It is possible that "hulling" strawberries refers to removing the skin as well as the calyx.

    hull (hŭl)
    n.
      1. The dry outer covering of a fruit, seed, or nut; a husk.
      2. The enlarged calyx of a fruit, such as a strawberry, that is usually green and easily detached.
      1. Nautical. The frame or body of a ship, exclusive of masts, engines, or superstructure.
      2. The main body of various other large vehicles, such as a tank, airship, or flying boat.
    1. The outer casing of a rocket, guided missile, or spaceship.
    tr.v., hulled, hull·ing, hulls.
    To remove the hulls of (fruit or seeds).
    [Middle English hulle, husk, from Old English hulu.]
    hull'er n.

    The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright © 2004, 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •