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    #1

    still and yet

    Dear teachers,

    I have three questions to ask:
    No.1 Please read the following

    One caregiver said that she has always been close to her mother. Another was the oldest child. __________ another was the youngest child.

    a. But b. Even c. Still d. Yet

    The key is 'c'. Could you please explain the difference between 'c' and 'd'?

    No.2
    Other materials are used in theworkshop also, ________ which some details will be given.
    a. about b. of
    The key is 'a'. But I can't find the collocation of 'details about'. I can only find the 'details of'. Could you please explain if it is a wrong key or both are correct?

    No.3
    They are people _______ whom we measure others.
    a. against b. with
    The key is 'a' but I think 'b' is also correct. Is that so?


    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Last edited by jiang; 16-Dec-2006 at 09:56.

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: still and yet

    No.1
    Another was the oldest child. Still another was the youngest child.

    The word yet functions sometimes as an adverb and has several meanings: in addition ("yet another cause of trouble" or "a simple yet noble woman"), even ("yet more expensive"), still ("he is yet a novice"), eventually ("they may yet win"), and so soon as now ("he's not here yet"). It also functions as a coordinating conjunction meaning something like "nevertheless" or "but."
    Source

    In colloquial spoken English, mind you, but still or still are sometimes used as less formal alternatives to yet:
    • The weather was lousy. It rained every day. Still, we managed to enjoy ourselves.
    • I don’t like the work very much. Mind you, the people I work with are very nice.
    • You can be very annoying at times, but we still love you.
    Source

    No.2
    Other materials are used in the workshop also, about which some details will be given.

    –preposition 1.of; concerning; in regard to: instructions about the work; a book about the Civil War.

    No.3
    They are people against whom we measure others.

    - measure against means to compare
    - measure with means to use as a tool

    Hope that helps.

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    #3

    Re: still and yet

    Dear Cas,

    Haven't heard from you for months. You must have been very busy in China. I hope you enjoy your stay in China.

    Thank you very much for your explanation. I have to ask more.
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    No.1

    Another was the oldest child. Still another was the youngest child.

    The word yet functions sometimes as an adverb and has several meanings: in addition ("yet another cause of trouble" or "a simple yet noble woman"), even ("yet more expensive"), still ("he is yet a novice"), eventually ("they may yet win"), and so soon as now ("he's not here yet"). It also functions as a coordinating conjunction meaning something like "nevertheless" or "but."
    Source
    Do you mean 'still' is the only choice?

    In colloquial spoken English, mind you, but still or still are sometimes used as less formal alternatives to yet:
    • The weather was lousy. It rained every day. Still, we managed to enjoy ourselves.
    • I don’t like the work very much. Mind you, the people I work with are very nice.
    • You can be very annoying at times, but we still love you.
    Source

    No.2
    Other materials are used in the workshop also, about which some details will be given.

    –preposition 1.of; concerning; in regard to: instructions about the work; a book about the Civil War.
    Could you please tell me if –preposition refers 'about' ? And do you think aobut is correct? Could you please tell me if 'of' is correct here?

    No.3
    They are people against whom we measure others.

    - measure against means to compare
    - measure with means to use as a tool
    There is an example in my dictionary: measure one's strength with ( or against) another's.
    That's why I felt confused. Could you please kindly explain that?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

    Hope that helps.
    Last edited by jiang; 17-Dec-2006 at 08:39.

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: still and yet

    Hey, it's good to be back. Nice to read you.

    No. 1
    To me, "Yet" expresses but, a contrast, in that context, whereas "Still" expresses, moreover, furthermore. If it's a contrast the writer wants to express, then "Yet" works.

    No. 2
    (1) Measure one's strength with another's
    (2) Measure one's strength against another's.

    They are synonymous. They express a comparison.

    Note, context is the issue here. Take a look at the original context in question,

    Ex: They are people against whom we measure others. <comparison>
    Ex: We measure these people against others. <comparison>

    Now,
    Ex: We measure them with others. (ambiguous: tool or comparison?)
    Last edited by Casiopea; 16-Dec-2006 at 15:23.

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    #5

    Re: still and yet


    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    Hey, it's good to be back. Nice to read you.

    No. 1
    To me, "Yet" expresses but, a contrast, in that context, whereas "Still" expresses, moreover, furthermore. If it's a contrast the writer wants to express, then "Yet" works.
    I understand this now.

    No. 2
    (1) Measure one's strength with another's
    (2) Measure one's strength against another's.

    They are synonymous. They express a comparison.
    I understand the above now.

    Note, context is the issue here. Take a look at the original context in question. The following is the sentence:
    Heroes and heroines are men and women distinguished by uncommon courage, achievements, and self-sacrifice made most often for the benefit of others---they are people ________ whom we meansure others.
    Could you please explain it?
    I understand the following now.

    Ex: They are people against whom we measure others. <comparison>
    Ex: We measure these people against others. <comparison>

    Now,
    Ex: We measure them with others. (ambiguous: tool or comparison?)

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: still and yet

    Sorry. I'm not sure if you need further help or not.

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    #7

    Re: still and yet


    Dear Cas,

    I am sorry I didn't make my message clear enough. The following is what I don't understand.

    'Note, context is the issue here. Take a look at the original context in question.' The following is the sentence:
    Heroes and heroines are men and women distinguished by uncommon courage, achievements, and self-sacrifice made most often for the benefit of others---they are people ________ whom we meansure others.
    Could you please explain if there is any difference between 'with' and 'against'?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    Sorry. I'm not sure if you need further help or not.
    Last edited by jiang; 23-Dec-2006 at 01:10.

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #8

    Re: still and yet

    OK. I see.

    with whom expresses a comparison based on similarity, whereas against whom doesn't. For example, A against B (one is better than the other) versus A with B (they might be equal). Does that help?

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    #9

    Re: still and yet


    Dear Cas,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see the explanation of 'with' and 'against'.
    I missed No.2
    No.2
    Other materials are used in the workshop also, about which some details will be given.

    Your explanation is –preposition 1.of; concerning; in regard to: instructions about the work; a book about the Civil War.
    Could you please tell me if –preposition refers to 'about' ? Could you please tell me if 'of' is correct here?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.
    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    OK. I see.

    with whom expresses a comparison based on similarity, whereas against whom doesn't. For example, A against B (one is better than the other) versus A with B (they might be equal). Does that help?
    Last edited by jiang; 17-Dec-2006 at 14:08.

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #10

    Re: still and yet

    You're most welcome.

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