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    #1

    me / I

    Dear Teacher

    It is a photo of you and me.
    It is a photo of you and I.

    Which sentence is correct?

    Thank you very much.

    With best wishes

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #2

    Re: me / I

    It's a photo of us.
    It's a photo of you and me.

    Note that, of is a preposition. It takes the pronouns me, you, him, her, it, them, us.

    All the best.

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    #3

    Re: me / I

    What about if it a caption? It should be 'Photo of you and me' because of the preposition 'of'. Am I correct?

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    #4

    If you were I / me

    Dear Teacher

    Should it be 'If you were I ...' OR 'If you were me ...'?

  2. rewboss's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2006
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    #5

    Re: If you were I / me

    Quote Originally Posted by kohyoongliat View Post
    What about if it a caption? It should be 'Photo of you and me' because of the preposition 'of'. Am I correct?
    Yes.

    Quote Originally Posted by kohyoongliat View Post
    Should it be 'If you were I ...' OR 'If you were me ...'?
    That's not so easy. It depends on whether you want to follow the traditional rules or the more natural rules.

    Some traditionalists say it must be "If you were I", because the object of the verb "to be" is identical to the subject -- and therefore they must both be in the nominative case. The verb is like an equals sign: "If you = I" -- "you" and "I" are the same thing.

    But most native speakers say "If you were me". The rule here is this: the verb "to be" is a special kind of verb called a "cupola", and instead of an object it takes something called a "complement". And if the complement of a cupola is a pronoun, it is an objective pronoun (me, him, her, etc).

    So, to summarise:

    "If you were I..." = traditional, old-fashioned
    "If you were me..." = idiomatic, natural

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: If you were I / me

    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss View Post
    Yes.


    That's not so easy. It depends on whether you want to follow the traditional rules or the more natural rules.

    Some traditionalists say it must be "If you were I", because the object of the verb "to be" is identical to the subject -- and therefore they must both be in the nominative case. The verb is like an equals sign: "If you = I" -- "you" and "I" are the same thing.

    But most native speakers say "If you were me". The rule here is this: the verb "to be" is a special kind of verb called a "cupola", and instead of an object it takes something called a "complement". And if the complement of a cupola is a pronoun, it is an objective pronoun (me, him, her, etc).

    So, to summarise:

    "If you were I..." = traditional, old-fashioned
    "If you were me..." = idiomatic, natural
    I would argue that the first is just as idiomatic as the second. Some may think it is old-fashined, but others would disagree.

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