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  1. retro's Avatar
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    #1

    drive out

    Hi,

    Would you check and correct my examples?

    1. New fashions can't drive out retro.

    2. Its five-game losing streak seems to have driven out Boston's hopes of making the playoff.

    3. She opend the window to drive the smoke out of the room.

    4. New investors coming along has driven out financial hardship for the company.

    Thank you.

    Happy New Year!
    Last edited by retro; 02-Jan-2007 at 23:28.

  2. rancher247's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: drive out

    3. opend should be opened
    4. "coming along has" should be "coming along have" (plural)
    I'm not sure if "coming along" makes sense.
    Everything else looks good!

  3. retro's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: drive out

    Quote Originally Posted by rancher247 View Post
    3. opend should be opened
    4. "coming along has" should be "coming along have" (plural)
    I'm not sure if "coming along" makes sense.
    Everything else looks good!
    How about:
    New investment/an investment of $100 000 has driven out financial hardship for the company.

    Also, can "drive out" be used in the passive?

  4. rancher247's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: drive out

    Quote Originally Posted by retro View Post
    How about:
    New investment/an investment of $100 000 has driven out financial hardship for the company.

    Also, can "drive out" be used in the passive?
    Um...as i'm not sure of the context, i'm not sure of whether "new" should be included in your first question, but the sentence should be either
    "A new investment of $100,000 has driven out financial hardship for the company" or "An investment of..."
    driven out is grammatically correct, although I'm not sure it would be commonly used in the context.

    As for your second question, I'm pretty sure you can use "drive out" in the passive.
    Ex:
    The smoke was driven out of the room by the draft when she opened the window.

    Of course, you usually want to avoid the passive tense.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: drive out

    Quote Originally Posted by rancher247 View Post
    ...

    Of course, you usually want to avoid the passive tense.
    Just you wait until MikeNewYork gets back. (Incidentally, it's not a tense.)

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 05-Jan-2007 at 13:03. Reason: Fix typo

  6. retro's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: drive out

    Thanx

  7. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: drive out

    Quote Originally Posted by retro View Post
    Hi,

    Would you check and correct my examples?

    1. New fashions can't drive out retro. Can't dismiss/get rid off

    2. Its five-game losing streak seems to have driven out Boston's hopes of making the playoff. Seen them off/got rid of them, they are no longer in contention because of their poor performance.

    3. She opend the window to drive the smoke out of the room. Cause a draught/expel the bad air

    4. New investors coming along has driven out financial hardship for the company. Made things better/created a better financial situation

    Thank you.

    Happy New Year!
    c

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