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    #1

    words italicized

    I am reading a large print Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice published by Dover Publications. I noticed Some words in it are italicized,
    e.g.
    Only think of that my dear; he actually danced with her twice.
    I certainly have had my share of beauty, but I do not pretend to be anything extradinary now.
    Elisabeth, for the sake of saying something that might turn her mother's thoughts, now asked her if Charlotte Lucas had been at Longbourn since her coming away.

    Why is that? Did Jane Austen Italicize these words when she wrote the book?
    Thanks.

  1. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: words italicized

    I don't know if she did, but by doing so the words are accentuated.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: words italicized

    Quote Originally Posted by MadHorse View Post
    I am reading a large print Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice published by Dover Publications. I noticed Some words in it are italicized,
    e.g.
    Only think of that my dear; he actually danced with her twice.
    I certainly have had my share of beauty, but I do not pretend to be anything extradinary now.
    Elisabeth, for the sake of saying something that might turn her mother's thoughts, now asked her if Charlotte Lucas had been at Longbourn since her coming away.

    Why is that? Did Jane Austen Italicize these words when she wrote the book?
    Thanks.
    She must have done. As curmudgeon said, they give emphasis. Jane Austen uses excessive emphasis to satirize the speech of empty-headed people - such as Mrs Bennett (who I'm pretty sure made the comment about dancing, and quite possibly says the bit about fading beauty). Mr Bennett, the tired listener, couldn't care less how many times who danced with whom.

    b


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    #4

    Re: words italicized

    Dear teachers:
    Thank you for your kind help. I have one more question.
    Mrs. Bennet indeed said the first two sentences, and I can imagine how she would accentuate those two words ( Alison Steadman’s shriek comes to mind).
    But I don’t understand the emphasis of the second ‘her’ in the third sentence. It’s a third person narrative, the major point is Elisabeth asked whether Charlotte Lucas had been at Longbourn, that who had come away really doesn't matter to either the speaker or the readers. Why is it Italicized? Maybe it's because the her implied a different person than the previous ‘her’ (the first her for Mrs. Bennet, the second her for Elisabeth)?
    The third sentence is in chapter nine when Mrs. Bennet visited Netherfield. She had said many a things embarrassing Elisabeth in front of the whole gang, so Elisabeth tried to change the subject. Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice, Chapter IX of Volume I (Chap. 9)
    Last edited by MadHorse; 08-Jan-2007 at 10:08.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: words italicized

    Quote Originally Posted by MadHorse View Post
    ...
    But I don’t understand the emphasis of the second ‘her’ in the third sentence. It’s a third person narrative, the major point is Elisabeth asked whether Charlotte Lucas had been at Longbourn, that who had come away really doesn't matter to either the speaker or the readers. Why is it Italicized? Maybe it's because the her implied a different person than the previous ‘her’ (the first her for Mrs. Bennet, the second her for Elisabeth)?
    ...


    b
    ps
    Re-reading that passage reminds me of a change in the language that you may find interesting: where we, today, would say 'everybody', Jane Austen writes 'every body'. It means the same (or almost the same - in that context it means 'all the people present' - but I'm not sure it could [in those days] be used to mean 'everyone in the world'), but the spelling as two words represents an earlier stage in the evolution of the word. Of course, speech comes before writing, but the writing shows that the speaker was using two words.


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    #6

    Re: words italicized

    Yes there are some evidences of language evolution in Jane Austen's novels. Offhandedly another example I can think of: they say 'fortnight' and we say 'two weeks'- and it's 'to-morrow fortninght' vs. 'in two weeks'.
    Regardless of their differences with contemporary writting, Jane Austen's novels are so brilliant that her readership doesn't seem to dwindle even after two haundred years. I think it'll remain so until the word ends.
    Thank you very much for your help Bob.

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