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    #1

    ought to/up to

    Could I use "up to" instead of "ought to"? For example:

    - He ought to buy a new computer next year.
    - He's up to buying a new computer next year.

    Are these the same? Or, the latter is wrong?

    Thanks.

  1. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: ought to/up to

    Quote Originally Posted by hlbert03 View Post
    Could I use "up to" instead of "ought to"? For example:

    - He ought to buy a new computer next year.
    - He's up to buying a new computer next year.

    Are these the same? Or, the latter is wrong?

    Thanks.
    Both are wrong. Better to say: He should buy a new computer soon.


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    #3

    Re: ought to/up to

    Quote Originally Posted by hlbert03 View Post
    Could I use "up to" instead of "ought to"? For example:

    - He ought to buy a new computer next year.
    - He's up to buying a new computer next year.

    Are these the same? Or, the latter is wrong?

    Thanks.
    Both are correct, but have different meaning.

    it would be prudent to buy one
    he has in mind to buy one


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    #4

    Re: ought to/up to

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Smith View Post
    Both are wrong. Better to say: He should buy a new computer soon.
    Both should and ought to express deontic modality

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: ought to/up to

    Quote Originally Posted by svartnik View Post
    Both are correct, but have different meaning.
    it would be prudent to buy one
    he has in mind to buy one
    Is the 'has in mind' one American English? In British English I'd understand 'he's up to buying a new computer' as meaning 'he's capable' of buying one (maybe only just capable of it: He's up to buying a new computer, but not a car.). If he was willing to buy one, then in some informal speech one might hear 'he's up for buying one', but not to.

    b

    ps The prudent meaning isn't the only one; it could also mean 'likely or due to, according to past behaviour':

    He's bought a new computer every three years for the last eight; so he ought to buy a new one next year.
    Last edited by BobK; 08-Jan-2007 at 18:26. Reason: Added PS


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    #6

    Re: ought to/up to

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Is the 'has in mind' one American English? In British English I'd understand 'he's up to buying a new computer' as meaning 'he's capable' of buying one (maybe only just capable of it: He's up to buying a new computer, but not a car.). If he was willing to buy one, then in some informal speech one might hear 'he's up for buying one', but not to.
    b
    Hello Bob,

    This is probably what he had in mind -- what he was thinking about.
    I go and see the kids. I wonder what they are up to this time.

  3. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: ought to/up to

    Quote Originally Posted by svartnik View Post
    Both should and ought to express deontic modality
    I used "Should" for giving advice.

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