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    #1

    Question

    On his first day of school, Rolihlahla was given his English name, Nelson, according to custom at the time in South African schools. As a young athlete, Mandela learned a regime of morning excercise that that taught him self-discipline and hard work.

    I don't understand this part , especially regime .

    thanks a lot.

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    #2

    Re: Question

    Quote Originally Posted by cutemina1211 View Post
    On his first day of school, Rolihlahla was given his English name, Nelson, according to custom at the time in South African schools. As a young athlete, Mandela learned a regime of morning excercise that that taught him self-discipline and hard work.
    I don't understand this part , especially regime .
    thanks a lot.
    Hi

    The basic meaning of "regime", a system of control, can be found in terms such as exercise regime or medical regime. [Wikipedia Dictionary]

    ....Mandela followed a regime of morning [controlled] exercise that taught him self-discipline and hard work."


    Self-discipline is a characteristic of strong, hardworking, successful people.

    Follow the link to learn more:
    self discipline and esteem
    Regards
    Last edited by Teia; 08-Jan-2007 at 13:46.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Question

    (and note teia's omission of the second 'that').

    b

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    #4

    Re: Question

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    (and note teia's omission of the second 'that').

    b
    Hi BobK

    I`d like to ask you a question. Are there any situations when we should or could use the word "that" twice in the same sentence? I don`t know why but I have the feeling that your answer might be affirmative. I was told that I should avoid using "that" twice[one after another- double "that"] in the same sentence as much as possible. Is this right?

    e.g. That that cheap hotel was clean and comfortable surprised us
    The lawyer insisted that that cheap hotel was clean and comfortable.
    Is the occurrence of "double that " rare[as in the examples above] in English ?

    Thank you very much
    Last edited by Teia; 08-Jan-2007 at 14:33.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Question

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    Hi BobK
    I`d like to ask you a question. Are there any situations when we should or could use the word "that" twice in the same sentence? I don`t know why but I have the feeling that your answer might be affirmative. I was told that I should avoid using "that" twice[one after another- double "that"] in the same sentence as much as possible. Is this right?
    e.g. That that cheap hotel was clean and comfortable surprised us
    The lawyer insisted that that cheap hotel was clean and comfortable.
    Is the occurrence of "double that " rare[as in the examples above] in English ?
    Thank you very much
    You're right to suppose I might say using double 'that' may sometimes be OK; both your examples could occur - though the second is more likely. A lot of people avoid double 'that' because it can be hard to read. In your second example, the reading with a schwa in the first 'that' is forced by the word 'insisted'. In the first sentence, you don't know whether there's been a typo (the repeated 'that', so hated by Microsoft Word!), until you get to the main verb ('surprised') - which confirms that the first 'that' is pronounced with a schwa.

    As to commonness - I wouldn't say it was common, but it's certainly not wrong. And it's more common in speech, because the two different vowels (/ə/ and //) make the grammatical status of the two sorts of 'that' clear (there are, of course, more than two sorts; but there are only two possible pronunciations, and the schwa is reserved for the conjunction).

    b

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    #6

    Re: Question

    Hi BobK

    Thank you very much for clarifying that


    Best wishes

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