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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #1

    adverb or noun clause?

    Hello

    1 Saturday is a day. -- What is Saturday? It is a day -- subject complement

    2 Saturday is when I will fix the faucet (= a certain time) (let us say, tomorrow). -- Saturday is tomorrow -- in this sentence, tomorrow is obviously an adverbial complement.

    When is Saturday? When I will have to fix the faucet. adverbial complementation, again

    In conclusion, in
    'Saturday is when I will have to fix the faucet,' 'when I will have to fix the faucet' is an adverbial clause, and not a nominal one.

    Do you agree?

    Thx
    Last edited by svartnik; 13-Jan-2007 at 15:45.

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: adverb or noun clause?

    Here's some food for thought.

    Adjectival clauses can begin with selected subordinating conjunctions:

    when - to describe a time

    Ex: Spring is the season when flowers will bloom.

    Main clause: Spring is the season
    Adjectival clause describing season: when flowers will bloom

    Alternative version: Spring is (a time) when flowers will bloom.

    Consider now,

    Ex: Saturday is (the day) when I will have to fix the faucet.

    What do you think?


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #3

    Re: adverb or noun clause?

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    Here's some food for thought.

    Adjectival clauses can begin with selected subordinating conjunctions:

    when - to describe a time

    Ex: Spring is the season when flowers will bloom.

    Main clause: Spring is the season
    Adjectival clause describing season: when flowers will bloom

    Alternative version: Spring is (a time) when flowers will bloom.

    Consider now,

    Ex: Saturday is (the day) when I will have to fix the faucet.

    What do you think?
    Very interesting.

    Saturday is when I will have to fix the car. -- adverbial or relative
    Saturday is the time when I will have to fix the car -- relative clause
    So what clause is the wh-clause only comes down to whether we assume 'the time' has been deleted by ellipsis.

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    #4

    Re: adverb or noun clause?

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    Here's some food for thought.

    Adjectival clauses can begin with selected subordinating conjunctions:

    when - to describe a time

    Ex: Spring is the season when flowers will bloom.

    Main clause: Spring is the season
    Adjectival clause describing season: when flowers will bloom

    Alternative version: Spring is (a time) when flowers will bloom.

    Consider now,

    Ex: Saturday is (the day) when I will have to fix the faucet.

    What do you think?
    I agree. "When clause" is an adjective clause because it is not used to modify a verb, as most adverbs do. "WHEN clause" is used to modify a noun which in this case is omitted. The key here comes back to what it modifies. Adjectives are used to modify nouns, but adverbs are used to modify verbs.

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #5

    Re: adverb or noun clause?

    Quote Originally Posted by svartnik View Post
    Very interesting.

    Saturday is when I will have to fix the car. -- adverbial or relative
    Saturday is the time when I will have to fix the car -- relative clause
    So what clause is the wh-clause only comes down to whether we assume 'the time' has been deleted by ellipsis.
    There's more to the apparent riddle. Here's more food for thought.

    Adverbs can modify nouns to indicate time or place:

    Ex: The concert tomorrow is sold out. <When?>
    Ex: Look at the people there. <Where?>

    tomorrow and there modify the nouns concert and people.

    Now consider,

    Ex: The concert that we'll be going to tomorrow is sold out. <When?>
    Ex: Look at the people who are sitting over there. <Where?>

    tomorrow and there modify the verbs will be going and are sitting.

    Hope that helps.

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