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  1. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
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    #1

    double negation

    Nobody nowhere came ever late.

    Is the sentence correct? Does it sound good?
    I was told that "nowhere" should be used - however, I'd rather use "anywhere".

  2. rancher247's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: double negation

    The sentence sounds confusing with the "nowhere" What are you trying to say?
    You need to change "came ever" to "ever came" at least for AE.
    "Nobody ever came late" is acceptable; I don't know how to insert "nowhere" or "anywhere" into that sentence without making the sentence a bit longer to ensure clarity.


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #3

    Re: double negation

    Using "anywhere" with the addition of two commas, along with the change in word order suggested by rancher, the sentence becomes:

    Nobody, anywhere, ever came late.

    This sentence does make sence. But neverthe less, it still doesn't read well.

  3. Lenka's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: double negation

    OK, thank you very much for your replies!!


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
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    #5

    Re: double negation

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Nobody nowhere came ever late.

    Is the sentence correct? Does it sound good?
    I was told that "nowhere" should be used - however, I'd rather use "anywhere".
    Lenka,

    Of course, out of context, it's hard to say what it means. Context context context.

    But this can be used to be very emphatic.

    NOBODY, NOWHERE ever came late!

    This could mean, as one example, that no employees under my direction, ever came late to any job site.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: double negation

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    Lenka,
    Of course, out of context, it's hard to say what it means. Context context context.
    But this can be used to be very emphatic.
    NOBODY, NOWHERE ever came late!
    This could mean, as one example, that no employees under my direction, ever came late to any job site.

    This sort of repeated negative can sometimes involve the breaking up of a negative pronoun.

    Don't you ever do that again - never - not ever.

    b

  5. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
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    #7

    Re: double negation

    Ehm... I am not sure I can understand it .

    Do you mean that both (1) and (2) a correct, but (2) would be used just to emphasize what you mean?

    (1) Nobody, anywhere, ever came late.
    (2) Nobody, nowhere, ever came late.


    I mean that "all of the people I am talking about (=> everyone) always came on time everywhere (to work, school etc.)" - "they were never delayed for their duties (work etc.)". By the way, is it possible to say it like this? Could you correct my English, please?

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: double negation

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Ehm... I am not sure I can understand it .

    Do you mean that both (1) and (2) a correct, but (2) would be used just to emphasize what you mean?

    ...
    Yes, although it's possible to say (1) with emphasis too. (1) is the safe option, that will get you exam points; but (2) is quite natural, if the context calls for sufficient emphasis.

    b

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