Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 3
    #1

    Question elaboration

    i would like to know the meaning of the following sentence:
    He hasn't never read only this book.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: elaboration

    He hasn't never read only this book

    It is meaningless.

    To make sense it would have to read :

    I
    He has only read this book [This book is the only one he has read]
    He hasn't ever read this book
    He has never read only this book [He has read other books than this one]

  2. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 3
    #3

    Re: elaboration

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    He hasn't never read only this book

    It is meaningless.

    To make sense it would have to read :

    I
    He has only read this book [This book is the only one he has read]
    He hasn't ever read this book
    He has never read only this book [He has read other books than this one]
    thank you, but could "never" be emphasis on negation?
    regards

    Today, the double negative is often considered the mark of an uneducated speaker, but it used to be quite common in English, even in literature. Chaucer made extensive use of double negatives in his poetry, sometimes even using triple negatives. For example, he described the Friar in the Canterbury Tales: "Ther nas no man no wher so vertuous" (i.e. "there wasn't no man nowhere so virtuous"), and he even used a fourfold negative when describing the Knight: "He nevere yet no vileynye ne sayde / In all his lyf unto no maner wight." Chaucer used these multiple negatives for emphasis and for metrical purposes

    This is an example of triple and quadruple negatives, used for emphasis. Another example:
    I am not never going to do nowt no more for thee.

  3. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 3
    #4

    Re: elaboration

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    He hasn't never read only this book

    It is meaningless.

    To make sense it would have to read :

    I
    He has only read this book [This book is the only one he has read]
    He hasn't ever read this book
    He has never read only this book [He has read other books than this one]
    regards,
    could "never" be for imphasis on negation in
    He hadn't never read only this book.

    This is an example of triple and quadruple negatives, used for emphasis. Another example:
    I am not never going to do nowt no more for thee.


    Today, the double negative is often considered the mark of an uneducated speaker, but it used to be quite common in English, even in literature. Chaucer made extensive use of double negatives in his poetry, sometimes even using triple negatives. For example, he described the Friar in the Canterbury Tales: "Ther nas no man no wher so vertuous" (i.e. "there wasn't no man nowhere so virtuous"), and he even used a fourfold negative when describing the Knight: "He nevere yet no vileynye ne sayde / In all his lyf unto no maner wight." Chaucer used these multiple negatives for emphasis and for metrical purposes.
    regards,
    nagah

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •