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    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 66
    #1

    about and of

    Let see this :

    He spoke about his holidays.

    He spoke of his holidays.


    Is there any difference in the meaning of `of and about' in the above sentences?


    • Join Date: Sep 2006
    • Posts: 150
    #2

    Re: about and of

    They are both correct, but "spoke about" is more usual.

    "He spoke of his holidays" would be okay in a poem or a story, but as normal speech it sounds strange.

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #3

    Re: about and of

    Welcome, viet_ghat.

    Here are two examples:

    #1 Imagine you're looking at a picture in a museum. The object in the picture is a box of oranges. It's a picture "of" oranges. The theme is about spring. It's a picture "about" spring.

    #2 There's a cartoon in the newspaper depicting a basketball game in which the players are dribbling a globe. It's a cartoon "of" Basketball and it's "about" International relations.

    In short, the preposition "of" refers to the name of the thing/object you're discussing, whereas the preposition "about" refers to its theme:

    Ex: You speak of giants. <people of great size>
    Ex: You speak about giants. <a topic; discourse or discussion>

    Ex: He spoke of his holiday. <holiday>
    Ex: He spoke about his holiday. <a topic; discourse or discussion>

    Themes are more interesting than things/objects. Which is why phrases such as talk about and speak about are more common than speak of and talk of.

    Hope that helps.


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 66
    #4

    Re: about and of

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    Welcome, viet_ghat.

    Here are two examples:

    #1 Imagine you're looking at a picture in a museum. The object in the picture is a box of oranges. It's a picture "of" oranges. The theme is about spring. It's a picture "about" spring.

    #2 There's a cartoon in the newspaper depicting a basketball game in which the players are dribbling a globe. It's a cartoon "of" Basketball and it's "about" International relations.

    In short, the preposition "of" refers to the name of the thing/object you're discussing, whereas the preposition "about" refers to its theme:

    Ex: You speak of giants. <people of great size>
    Ex: You speak about giants. <a topic; discourse or discussion>

    Ex: He spoke of his holiday. <holiday>
    Ex: He spoke about his holiday. <a topic; discourse or discussion>

    Themes are more interesting than things/objects. Which is why phrases such as talk about and speak about are more common than speak of and talk of.

    Hope that helps.
    Super explanation.

    Thank you.

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #5

    Re: about and of

    You're most welcome.

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