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    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 13
    #1

    Auxiliary verb before pronoun in affirmative sentences

    could anyone explain to me when we put the auxiliary verb (do,have etc..) before the pronoun in AFFIRMATIVE sentences?

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: Auxiliary verb before pronoun in affirmative sentences

    Do you mean after the pronoun? If so, then, those auxiliaries are used for emotive or contrastive emphasis when the speaker or writer feel strongly about something. Here are examples with do and does:

    Ex: She thinks he doesn't love her, but he does love her.
    Ex: You do look pretty in that new outfit! Quite stunning!
    Ex: Are you all right? You do look a bit pale. Do please sit down.
    Ex: I don't see very much of my old friends now, but I do still email them.
    Ex: Was that a joke? I do believe you're teasing me!

    When using auxiliaries for contrastive or emotive emphasis, the speaker gives them extra stress in pronunciation to make them sound louder, longer or higher in tone. When you see these words in print used in this way, they will normally be in italics or bold type or in CAPITAL LETTERS.

    Read more here ...

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #3

    Re: Auxiliary verb before pronoun in affirmative sentences

    There's also...

    When a negative word such as never, rarely, hardly begins a sentence, the subject and verb are inverted. In other words, the question word order is used.

    Rarely do I find better food than I get at Moss Burgers.

    ===========

    A tag question asks for clarification of a statement. The speaker wants to know if the statement is correct or wants to seek agreement.

    An affirmative sentence has a negative tag.

    Jack works at McDowell’s, doesn’t he?

    A negative sentence has a positive tag.

    Nobody called on the phone, did they?

    Source

    All the best.


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 13
    #4

    Re: Auxiliary verb before pronoun in affirmative sentences

    Thank you! I was referring to the second answer, but thank you anyway!

    and so, can I say both:

    Rarely do I find better food than I get at Moss Burgers.

    and

    I rarely find better food than I get at Moss Burgers.

    ????

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #5

    Re: Auxiliary verb before pronoun in affirmative sentences

    Yes. Both are English.

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