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    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 319
    #1

    Qs

    #1If you had to choose one, which one would you choose?

    My boss ( ) abroad twice in the past three months.
    1. have been 2. had gone 3. has ever been 4. had never been

    Is there the answer?

    #2 I don't think he's working ( ) to finish on schedule.
    1. enough fast 2. fast enough 3. quite enough fast 4. very fast enough

    I think the anser is 2 fast enough, but why 4 very fast enoug? Because of its meaning?

    #3 If you order the following sentences correctly to make sence, how would you do?
    1.It wa my fault. I should have listened to you the first time you said it.
    2.I'm sorry about the other day. I wasn't considerate enough.
    3.No, no. The fault was mine.
    4.I was begining to think that I was a bit irritated myself

    Thank you very much

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: Qs

    #1 My boss ( ) abroad twice in the past three months.
    1. have been 2. had gone 3. has ever been 4. had never been

    1. have been doesn't fit. The verb have is plural; its subject My boss is singular.


    3. has ever been doesn't fit. 'Ever' is used
    a. in questions. e.g.

    Have you ever been to England?

    Has she ever met the Prime Minister?


    b. in negative questions e.g.

    Haven't they ever been to Europe?

    Haven't you ever eaten Chinese food?


    c. and in negative statements using the pattern nothing.......ever, nobody.......ever e.g.

    Nobody has ever said that to me before.

    Nothing like this has ever happened to us.


    d. 'Ever' is also used with 'The first time.... e.g.

    It's the first time (that) I've ever eaten snails.

    This is the first time I've ever been to England.
    3. had never been doesn't work. 'Never' means at no time before now, and is the same as not...ever. Our example sentence #1 has the phrase twice in the past three months.

    Ex: My boss ( ) abroad twice in the past three months.


    #2 I don't think he's working ( ) to finish on schedule.
    1. enough fast 2. fast enough 3. quite enough fast 4. very fast enough

    4. very fast enough doesn't work because very and enough are semantically incompatible. enough means'to the necessary degree', whereas very means 'in a high degree'.

    #3 If you order the following sentences correctly to make sense, how would you do?
    1. It was my fault. I should have listened to you the first time you said it.
    2. I'm sorry about the other day. I wasn't considerate enough.
    3. No, no. The fault was mine.
    4. I was begining to think that I was a bit irritated myself.
    Please provide your answer first.


    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 319
    #3

    Re: Qs

    Thank you very much Casiopea

    I think 2 3 1 4

    But I have to choose one from a(2413) b(3142) c(4312) D( 1234)

    Is the answer a(2413)

    Thank you very much

  2. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
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      • UK
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      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #4

    Re: Qs

    Quote Originally Posted by Progress View Post
    #1If you had to choose one, which one would you choose?

    My boss ( ) abroad twice in the past three months.
    1. have been 2. had gone 3. has ever been 4. had never been

    Is there the answer?
    If I had to, I'd choose 2. But I'd prefer 'has gone', because of the word "past"; it seems to me that the past perfect requires the word "previous".

    Quote Originally Posted by Progress View Post
    #2 I don't think he's working ( ) to finish on schedule.
    1. enough fast 2. fast enough 3. quite enough fast 4. very fast enough

    I think the anser is 2 fast enough , but why 4 very fast enoug? Because of its meaning?
    I'm not sure what your question about 4 is, but 'very' and 'enough' are mutually exclusive.

    Quote Originally Posted by Progress View Post
    #3 If you order the following sentences correctly to make sence, how would you do?
    1.It wa my fault. I should have listened to you the first time you said it.
    2.I'm sorry about the other day. I wasn't considerate enough.
    3.No, no. The fault was mine.
    4.I was begining to think that I was a bit irritated myself

    Thank you very much
    The order of the first three is 2/1/3; but I don't understand 4, so can't say with any confidence where it should go - probably at the end, but a bit more context would help.

    b

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #5

    Re: Qs

    I'm in agreement with BobK. #1 should be has been. With that in mind, I can see why #3 is difficult to order. There's a grammar mistake.

    2. I'm sorry about the other day. I wasn't considerate enough.
    3. No, no. The fault was mine.
    1. It was my fault. I should have listened to you the first time you said it.
    4. I was begining to think that I was a bit irritated myself.

    I like either 2314 or 2134, but they are not in the answer key. Hmm. OK. Let's do what you should always do when you get stuck on an exam question: process of elimination:

    2413
    3142 <definitely not; sentence 2. is an intro, not a ending>
    4312 <definitely not; same reason as above>
    1234 <definitely not; similar reason as above>

    Looks as if 2413 is the key. (I'm not all the sure what 4. means... It's an odd sentence. Shouldn't it be, I was beginning to think that I was a bit irritating myself?)


    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 319
    #6

    Re: Qs

    Thank you extremely very much, BobK and Casiopea!!!

    First I thought My boss has been abroad twice in the past three months. So, I asked like that.

    If Mr.A speaks three sentences continously as

    Mr. A : 2 I'm sorry about the other day. I wasn't considerate enough"
    4. I was beging to think that I was a bit irritated myself
    Mr. B : 1. It was my fault. I should have listened to you the first time you said it
    Mr.A :No, no. The fault is mine.

    Is the flow good? Is the sentence 4 itself sounds strange?


    Those questions come from an entrance exam of a university in Japan. Threre are sometimes strange questions and mistakes. If they had asked some native speakers to check them, such a thing would not have happened.

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #7

    Re: Qs

    Try,

    Pat: I'm sorry about the other day. I wasn't considerate enough. (2.)
    Sam: I was beginning to think that I was a bit irritating myself. (4.)
    Pat: It was my fault. I should've listened to you the first time you said it. (1.)
    Sam: No, no. The fault was mine. (3.)

    "irritated" should be irritating. In other words, Sam realizes her harping on Pat (Passage Hint: Pat says, 'I should have listened to you the first time') may have irritated Pat and caused Pat to react the way he did.

    Mind you ... 4. is still semantically awkward. "beginning to think", the inceptive, is a problem still. Hmpf.

    Quote Originally Posted by Progress
    Those questions come from an entrance exam of a university in Japan. Threre are sometimes strange questions and mistakes. If they had asked some native speakers to check them, such a thing would not have happened.
    Ah, I see. You know, I taught in Japan for six years, <ara!> so I am all too familiar with the system. It's not necessarily that they, the university, didn't ask a native speaker to check the exam or that there wasn't a native speaker available to do it; it's more so and generally the case that the experience and knowledge of the person who wrote the exam should not -scratch that- never be challenge.

    Yoroshiku, onegaishimasu.
    Gambatte! <fight, perservere>


    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 319
    #8

    Re: Qs

    Thank you very much, Casiopea. Wow you taught in Japan for six years. Sugoii (great)!
    >Yoroshiku, onegaishimasu
    Kochira koso
    >Gambatte
    Arigatou gozaimasu. Gambari masu!

    #4 Instead how about saying I began a bit irritating

    I can't understand part of your post scratch that - never be challenge

    Dose scratch that means erase that?

    I'm sorry. anther question

    Community isn't so much a place as it is a state of mind. You find it whenever folks ask how you're doing because they care, and not because they're getting paid to inquire.
    ->Community isn't so much a place as comuity is a state of mind
    ->Community is not just a place but a .....
    What does a state of mind in this case? I think it is heart like home sweet home.


    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 319
    #9

    Re: Qs

    See you tomorrow It is 1:56 am here. Arigatou gozaimashita

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #10

    Re: Qs

    Quote Originally Posted by Progress
    I began a bit irritating
    It wouldn't work either. Try, I was also inconsiderate. My behavior, I realize now, probably irritated you.


    Quote Originally Posted by Progress
    I can't understand the part of your post scratch that - never be challenge
    Does scratch that means erase that?
    Yes. Exactly that.

    Quote Originally Posted by rezza
    What does a state of mind in this case? I think it is heart like home sweet home.
    Actually, it means, a way of thinking. For example, in Japan it's really cold in February and as you know in most school there are no heaters, but students feel warm: they think warm thoughts. It's a [positive] state of mind.

    All the best.

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