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    • Join Date: Feb 2006
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    #1

    surge in

    can anyone tell me the meaning of surge in this sentense
    an unexpected surge in elctrical power cause the computer to crash

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    #2

    Re: surge in

    A sudden increase in the electrical supply.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: surge in

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    A sudden increase in the electrical supply.
    So there isn't - as the thread's title implies - a phrasal connection between surge and in, as there would be in a context such as this: When the police opened the gate, it allowed the crowd to surge in.

    b


    • Join Date: Sep 2006
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    #4

    Re: surge in

    Sure, as far as I know in electric system, the phenomenon appears if the thunder hit the power supply system, but most power supply system can filtrate the unexpected increasement by the filtrating device.
    So in this sentence, I do think Tdol's answer is perfectly correct.
    In Chinese, it calls 浪涌现象
    Pls correct if I am wrong!

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    #5

    Re: surge in

    Quote Originally Posted by wuwei View Post
    Sure, as far as I know in electric system, the phenomenon appears if [the] thunder hits the power supply system, but most power supply systems can filtrate* the unexpected increase[ment] by the filtrating* device.
    So in this sentence, I do think Tdol's answer is perfectly correct.
    ...
    -Tdol's answer is fine.

    * Incidentally, 'filtrating device' is wrong - the word is 'filter'. (The mains power has a built-in filter; the mains voltage commonly referred to as '240 volts' in facts fluctuates between 230v and 250v. But some surges are bigger than that, and the built-in filter isn't good enough. So people with sensitive electric equipment can buy a device called a 'surge protector'.)

    b

    PS -
    Here's one: http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B0...6.LZZZZZZZ.jpg


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    #6

    Re: surge in

    Thanks for your correcting, BobK

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    #7

    Re: surge in

    Where I live, there can be surges that the built-in systmes can't cope with, so I have a serious looking piece of machinery that stands between the power supply and my computer.

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