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    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #1

    Do you have a little leeway in what you want to say?

    Do you have a little leeway in what you want to say?

    What does leeway mean in this context? Thanks.


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #2

    Re: Do you have a little leeway in what you want to say?

    Quote Originally Posted by piousoul View Post
    Do you have a little leeway in what you want to say?

    What does leeway mean in this context? Thanks.
    The opportunity to speak more freely instead of being restricted to certain topics/content/etc.

    Another phrase with a similar meaning is 'wiggle room'.


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 289
    #3

    Thumbs up Re: Do you have a little leeway in what you want to say?

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    The opportunity to speak more freely instead of being restricted to certain topics/content/etc.

    Another phrase with a similar meaning is 'wiggle room'.
    Thanks, riverkid, for the clarification, but does it have the connotation of "off the topic a little bit?"
    Thanks.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #4

    Re: Do you have a little leeway in what you want to say?

    Quote Originally Posted by piousoul View Post
    Thanks, riverkid, for the clarification, but does it have the connotation of "off the topic a little bit?"
    Thanks.
    No - it means you can speak without being constrained too much. "Off the topic" means that the subject originally being discussed is no longer the subject of the discussion.


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #5

    Smile Re: Do you have a little leeway in what you want to say?

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    No - it means you can speak without being constrained too much. "Off the topic" means that the subject originally being discussed is no longer the subject of the discussion.
    Thanks, Anglika, for your feedback.


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
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    #6

    Re: Do you have a little leeway in what you want to say?

    Quote Originally Posted by piousoul View Post
    Thanks, riverkid, for the clarification, but does it have the connotation of "off the topic a little bit?"
    Thanks.
    If I understand you to mean that the speaker can go off the topic a bit, then I suppose that leeway must include that, Piousoul. IMHO, I can't see how it couldn't include that.


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 289
    #7

    Smile Re: Do you have a little leeway in what you want to say?

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    If I understand you to mean that the speaker can go off the topic a bit, then I suppose that leeway must include that, Piousoul. IMHO, I can't see how it couldn't include that.
    Thanks, riverkid, for your comment again.
    Let's clear it up with an example: if a non-native speaker wants to go to church on Sunday, yet he says, "I want to go to the church on Sunday."
    Could you reply to him, "Did you have a little leeway in what you wanted to say?"
    If not, in what case would you use the statement in question? Thanks.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #8

    Re: Do you have a little leeway in what you want to say?

    Quote Originally Posted by piousoul View Post
    Thanks, riverkid, for your comment again.
    Let's clear it up with an example: if a non-native speaker wants to go to church on Sunday, yet he says, "I want to go to the church on Sunday."
    Could you reply to him, "Did you have a little leeway in what you wanted to say?"
    If not, in what case would you use the statement in question? Thanks.

    noun 1 the amount of freedom to move or act that is available: we have a lot of leeway in how we do our jobs. 2 the sideways drift of a ship to leeward of the desired course.


    Your response to the statement would be "Do you have a little leeway about that?" - ie can he change his plans and go another time.

    "Leeway" can be used if there is a discussion about abstract topics such as politics, where differing viewpoints can be put forward. "The discussion today is about the effect of communistic practice on society. You have a little leeway in presenting your arguments."

    It can also be used in discussions about money - "I need to consider my budget. Do I have any leeway in what I can do with my money?"


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 289
    #9

    Thumbs up Re: Do you have a little leeway in what you want to say?

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    noun 1 the amount of freedom to move or act that is available: we have a lot of leeway in how we do our jobs. 2 the sideways drift of a ship to leeward of the desired course.
    Your response to the statement would be "Do you have a little leeway(=a little freedom or options) about that?" - ie can he change his plans and go another time.
    "Leeway" can be used if there is a discussion about abstract topics such as politics, where differing viewpoints can be put forward. "The discussion today is about the effect of communistic practice on society. You have a little leeway(=limited freedom) in presenting your arguments."
    It can also be used in discussions about money - "I need to consider my budget. Do I have any leeway(=limited freedom) in what I can do with my money?"
    Thanks, Anglika, for the additional samples and clarifications.
    If I subtitute the words in bold and blue for the above leeways, do they sound right? Do they change the original meanings?
    Thanks.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #10

    Re: Do you have a little leeway in what you want to say?

    "limited freedom" is rather a contradiction for "leeway", which implies "some freedom" of action.

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