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    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 289
    #1

    Smile came hurrying and hassled

    When I came hurrying and hassled into class, my teacher, Mis Levy, said, "Indie! You're very late!"

    This is a line from "INDIE KIDD" book, and my first question is what does the words in bold mean?
    Second, why is it not hasstling but hassled? The phrase in bold seems unbalanced, right?

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: came hurrying and hassled

    Balance it out and it makes the speaker look unbalanced. The present participle expresses a different meaning. If you are hassling someone, you are bothering or annoying or harassing them.

    Ex: They came in hurrying and hassling each other.
    Ex: ?I came in hurrying and hassling myself.

    To be in a hassled state is to be bothered or annoyed by a problem brought about by pressures of time, money, inconvenience, etc.

    All the best.


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 289
    #3

    Thumbs up Re: came hurrying and hassled

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    Balance it out and it makes the speaker look unbalanced. The present participle expresses a different meaning. If you are hassling someone, you are bothering or annoying or harassing them.

    Ex: They came in hurrying and hassling each other.
    Ex: ?I came in hurrying and hassling myself.

    To be in a hassled state is to be bothered or annoyed by a problem brought about by pressures of time, money, inconvenience, etc.

    All the best.
    Thanks, Casiopea, for the as transparent as air parse.

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #4

    Re: came hurrying and hassled

    Is that a good thing?

    You're most welcome.

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