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  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Deciphering a sentence

    MNY or any other who might answer,

    The CMS says there is no grammatical or historical foundation for the proscription of a sentence beginning with a "conjunction."

    I wrote them and mentioned that such sentences should be found in a compound sentence, and whether you agree or not, that is the grammatical foundation for the claim.

    I have a record of our conversation which basically shows me nailing the poor lady. I say it like that only due to the avoidence of the issue, not because I was right or she was wrong. That aside, the fourth response I got was from a different person. He responded to my initial e-mail with something that I don't even understand, and it doesn't seem to be a complete thought. Could you tell me what this means?

    "Dear Mr. Machiz,

    Thank you for your question about The Chicago Manual of Style. It's really outside the purview of the Manual, however, whose "Grammar and Usage" chapter is intended to be a useful digest of frequently encountered problems for writers, editors, and publishers--not a technical linguistic treatise. Thank you for your interest in the University of Chicago Press's publishing program.

    Sincerely,

    *&%#!@

  2. #2
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Deciphering a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Machiz
    MNY or any other who might answer,

    The CMS says there is no grammatical or historical foundation for the proscription of a sentence beginning with a "conjunction."
    It should say "coordinating conjuntion", but, other than that, it's correct.

    I wrote them and mentioned that such sentences should be found in a compound sentence, and whether you agree or not, that is the grammatical foundation for the claim.
    That argument is self-referential. It starts with an assumption and then use it to arrive at a conclusion.

    I have a record of our conversation which basically shows me nailing the poor lady. I say it like that only due to the avoidence of the issue, not because I was right or she was wrong.
    I can't make a judgment on that, but I have heard you say the same thing about other issues. In many cases, the issue wasn't being avoided at all.

    That aside, the fourth response I got was from a different person. He responded to my initial e-mail with something that I don't even understand, and it doesn't seem to be a complete thought. Could you tell me what this means?

    "Dear Mr. Machiz,

    Thank you for your question about The Chicago Manual of Style. It's really outside the purview of the Manual, however, whose "Grammar and Usage" chapter is intended to be a useful digest of frequently encountered problems for writers, editors, and publishers--not a technical linguistic treatise. Thank you for your interest in the University of Chicago Press's publishing program.

    Sincerely,

    *&%#!@
    It says that your question is outside the purview of the CMS, because it is a style manual, and not intended to be a grammar. :wink:

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