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    #1

    break up; cross

    Dear teachers,

    I have two questions to ask:

    No.1
    When the crowd saw the prize-fighter stretched out on the canvas, shouts and cheers________ from it.

    a. broke up b. broke forth c. broke through d. broke upon

    I can find 'a', 'c' and 'd' in my dictionary but I can't find 'b' so I can't decide which is the correct answer. Could you please kindly explain which is correct?

    No.2

    Paul was lying on the lawn, his hands________under his head.
    a. crossing b. crossed
    The key is 'b'. Does it mean I should say 'My hands are crossed' but I can't say 'My hands are crossing'?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  1. Philly's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: break up; cross

    Both of your sentences are a bit odd to me.

    In the first, broke forth (or broke out) would be appropriate. And I'd omit "from it" from the sentence. You can check the meanings of the word 'forth' in your dictionary.

    In the second sentence, I don't think the verb 'cross' in either form is appropriate or natural. I might say 'his hands clasped under his head', for example.

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    #3

    Re: break up; cross

    Dear Philly,
    Thank you very much for your explanation.

    No.1 is really a problem because I can't find the phrase 'break forth' in my dictionary. I understand your explanation if 'from it' is omitted then both are correct.
    No.2
    I understand your explanation.

    Best wishes,

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    Both of your sentences are a bit odd to me.

    In the first, broke forth (or broke out) would be appropriate. And I'd omit "from it" from the sentence. You can check the meanings of the word 'forth' in your dictionary.

    In the second sentence, I don't think the verb 'cross' in either form is appropriate or natural. I might say 'his hands clasped under his head', for example.

  2. Philly's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: break up; cross

    Hi Jiang

    I suggested omitting "from it" because it's unnecessary and also awkward in the sentence. I'd only add the information "from ---" if the shouts and cheers came from people who were not part of the crowd.

    I wrote "break out" in addition to "break forth" because the meanings would be basically the same in your sentence. You could use either one.

    I'm not surprised that you haven't found "break forth" in your dictionary. It's unusual. This usage of the word 'forth' sounds very formal and a bit old-fashioned to me. The most important thing here is to know the meanings of 'forth'. That's why I suggested that you check only 'forth' in the dictionary.
    forth - Definitions from Dictionary.com

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    #5

    Re: break up; cross

    I'd agree with Philly; "break forth from" (i.e. here, "to burst out suddenly and spontaneously from") has a literary air.

    However, "prize-fighter" is also quite old-fashioned; the sentence as a whole might happily depict some early 19th century scene.

    All the best,

    MrP

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    #6

    Re: break up; cross

    Dear Philly,
    Thank you very much for your further explanation. Now I see.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    Hi Jiang

    I suggested omitting "from it" because it's unnecessary and also awkward in the sentence. I'd only add the information "from ---" if the shouts and cheers came from people who were not part of the crowd.

    I wrote "break out" in addition to "break forth" because the meanings would be basically the same in your sentence. You could use either one.

    I'm not surprised that you haven't found "break forth" in your dictionary. It's unusual. This usage of the word 'forth' sounds very formal and a bit old-fashioned to me. The most important thing here is to know the meanings of 'forth'. That's why I suggested that you check only 'forth' in the dictionary.
    forth - Definitions from Dictionary.com

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    #7

    Re: break up; cross

    Dear MrPedantic,

    Thank you very much for your help. Now I see. Such exercises are always difficult to deal with.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by MrPedantic View Post
    I'd agree with Philly; "break forth from" (i.e. here, "to burst out suddenly and spontaneously from") has a literary air.

    However, "prize-fighter" is also quite old-fashioned; the sentence as a whole might happily depict some early 19th century scene.

    All the best,

    MrP

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