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    #1

    Question Hallelujah

    Hello,

    Today I'd like to ask questions about lyrics for a change.

    I suppose a song called "Hallelujah" sung by Leonard Cohen, Jeff Buckley,
    U2 and so on..., is very popular.

    I wonder who "you" and "she" are in this song.
    I mean, is "you" a lover, or a person who has a power like a king
    or politician?
    I'm confused with the part "And she tied you to her kitchen chair
    And she broke your throne, and she cut your hair".

    Could you please help me understand this song?

    I don't paste the whole lyrics here since I'm not sure if it is
    OK to do so.


    Thank you,
    Tara

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: Hallelujah

    You could provide us with a link.

    Here's one: U2 - HALLELUJAH LYRICS

    I prefer K.D. Lang's version.
    I've always wondered about what the line "tied you to her kitchen chair" refers to.
    I thought the "broke your throne" and "cut your hair" part was in reference to Samson and Delilah.

    Let's see what people know.
    Last edited by Casiopea; 14-Feb-2007 at 13:09. Reason: Added links

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: Hallelujah

    The following is not my interpretation. I found the information at SongFacts. Here's the link: Hallelujah by Jeff Buckley Songfacts
    The song is about love which has soured and gone stale. Cohen used a lot of religious imagery, including references to some of the more notorious women in the bible. Here's some lyrical analysis:

    "You saw her bathing on the roof, her beauty and the moonlight overthrew you" - Bathsheba, who tempted the king to kill her husband so he could have her.

    "She tied you to her kitchen chair, she broke your throne and she cut your hair" - Delilah, who cut off Sampson's locks that held his superhuman strength.

    "But remember when I moved in you and the holy dove was moving too" - This could be a reference to the divine conception and Mary.

    The lines referring to the immaculate conception can also be interpreted as having a sexual connotation: "And every breath we drew was hallelujah."
    Last edited by Casiopea; 15-Feb-2007 at 10:41.

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    #4

    Re: Hallelujah

    Hello Casiopea,

    >You could provide us with a link.

    That's right.
    For some reason, I didn't think of it.
    I hope you don't think I'm stupid.

    Thanks for the link!

    Tara

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    #5

    Re: Hallelujah

    Hello Casiopea,

    Thank you so much for your interpretation.

    So, is this a song about "I" moan to his lover about their relationship?
    I wonder if "your flag on the marble arch" is also a reference from the bible.

    I understand they are quotes from the bible.
    But it is more confusing.
    I mean, what is "I" exactly trying to say by quoting them?
    Does "I" use them as examples of dark side of love?

    It's a mystery for me.
    Maybe I don't have enough imagination to understand these poetic expression.

    Tara

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Hallelujah

    Quote Originally Posted by tara View Post
    ...
    Maybe I don't have enough imagination to understand these poetic expressions.

    Tara
    Me neither. But I much prefer the Leonard Cohen version; he pronounces the /tu: jə/ (through ya/ outdrew ya...) to rhyme with 'Hallelujah'. Most cover versions either miss the rhyme or try to adopt an 'appropriate' mid-Atlantic accent.

    b

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    #7

    Re: Hallelujah

    Hello BobK,

    Thank you very much for correcting my grammatical mistake.

    > u: jə/ (through ya/ outdrew ya...) to rhyme with 'Hallelujah'.

    Wow. That's good to know.

    Thank you,
    Tara

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #8

    Re: Hallelujah

    Quote Originally Posted by tara View Post
    Hello Casiopea,

    Thank you so much for your interpretation.
    Tara, it wasn't my interpretation.

    Let me go back and edit that last post of mine. Please re-visit it.

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    #9

    Re: Hallelujah

    Hello Casiopea,

    >Tara, it wasn't my interpretation.

    Uh, excuse me.
    You've given me useful informations to understand the song.
    Thank you!

    Tara

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