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  1. Lenka's Avatar

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    #1

    when ...-ing, if

    I will always love this town and when being sad I'll always come back and ...

    Is it incorrect to use "when being"? Why? What shall I say instead? "and if I am sad I (will) always come back and...."

  2. angliholic's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: when ...-ing, if

    I will always love this town; when sad, I always come back and ...

  3. Lenka's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: when ...-ing, if

    Do you mean it is impossible (incorrect) to use the sentence I wrote?

  4. angliholic's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: when ...-ing, if

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Do you mean it is impossible (incorrect) to use the sentence I wrote?
    It's possible; I just offered my version for your reference. You could also write:

    I always love this little town; being sad, I always come back and...
    I always love this little town; if sad, I always come back and...

    One and was omitted by me because personally I don't like too many ands repeated within a sentence.
    Last edited by angliholic; 17-Feb-2007 at 06:19.


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
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    #5

    Re: when ...-ing, if

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    I will always love this town and when being sad I'll always come back and ...

    Is it incorrect to use "when being"? Why? What shall I say instead? "and if I am sad I (will) always come back and...."
    It's grammatically possible but semantically odd, Lenka. Maybe it's because when we use the progressive of 'be', 'being', it seems to give a meaning like planned or choosing to be [something].

    We often use "being + adjective" to describe a behavior that is being done on purpose;

    He's being silly.

    She's being playful.

    They're being deceitful.

    So, is "being sad" something that the person in the example sentence is doing on purpose or is it something that just happens? My guess is that's why we don't use the progressive sense of 'be' in this fashion.

    You can use 'if I'm sad' but that makes the idea much more conditional, much less likely to happen. But I'd say [wouldn't you agree?] that sadness is a much more common emotion than that described by 'if' so 'when' works perfectly ---> "when I'm sad"

  5. angliholic's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: when ...-ing, if

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    Maybe it's because when we use the progressive of 'be', 'being', it seems to give a meaning like planned or choosing to be [something].

    We often use "being + adjective" to describe a behavior that is being done on purpose;
    Sorry, riverkid, but I have some doubts. What do you think of the following sentences?

    1. The weather being fine, we went on a picnic.

    2. When the weather was fine, we went on a picnic.


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    #7

    Re: when ...-ing, if

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Sorry, riverkid, but I have some doubts. What do you think of the following sentences?

    1. The weather being fine, we went on a picnic.

    2. When the weather was fine, we went on a picnic.
    I have some doubts too, Angliholic. That why I hedged my position slightly.

    Your sentences do not relate to people as does Lenka's original sentence. What is it exactly that you have doubts on?

  6. angliholic's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: when ...-ing, if

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    I have some doubts too, Angliholic. That why I hedged my position slightly.

    Your sentences do not relate to people as does Lenka's original sentence. What is it exactly that you have doubts on?
    I have found a few samples from my grammar book in which the subjects of the present participle "being+adjective" do relate to people and their behaviors are not obviously done with purpose. My samples are as follows:

    1. Being ill, He cannot attend the meeting.
    2. His mother being ill, he can't attend the meeting.
    3. Being tired, I went to bed early.

    Hedging our position slightly is a good policy when dealing with English questions because there are just too many possible situations in the real world. And I'm going to take it as my motto.
    Someone on another forum wrote, "There are no facts but only interpretations." It's a wonderful guindeline for me to follow, too.


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    #9

    Re: when ...-ing, if

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    I have found a few samples from my grammar book in which the subjects of the present participle "being+adjective" do relate to people and their behaviors are not obviously done with purpose. My samples are as follows:

    1. Being ill, He cannot attend the meeting.
    2. His mother being ill, he can't attend the meeting.
    3. Being tired, I went to bed early.
    There is a difference between these adjectives and the one Lenka used /ones I used, Angliholic. Being ill or tired is not something we choose. We have no choice in the matter of becoming ill or tired.

    People can choose to be silly or deceitful and some probably do consciously choose to be sad, but the language in Lenka's example gives no indication of that. It seems like a naturally occurring 'sad', while using 'being' seems to indicate/point to more in the way of a choice.

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