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    • Join Date: Dec 2005
    • Posts: 417
    #1

    Smile in or on

    I took one of your tests. One of the questions was this "The bank is ... Western Avenue". 1) at 2)in 3)for
    The correct answer is "in"
    Don't we say the bank is "on" Western Avenue?
    Thanks

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: in or on

    That's a good catch. Thank you. "in" might be British English. I'll have Tdol, our Editor, take a look.

    All the best.

    What's the link?

  2. #3

    Re: in or on

    The truth is:
    People say "in" in British but "on" in AmE
    I read a book told about that this evening :D

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
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      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,864
    #4

    Re: in or on

    I have looked at the question and can't see that there is a real problem here- some use 'in', while others use 'on', but it doesn't say that 'on' is an error. Our policy towards variations of English is inclusive, so British users will contribute in British English, Americans in American English, etc. The other answers don't work, so it the logical choice. English is a very international language and there are differences in usage, which we reflect. In a globalised society, people have to get used to such differences. You are right, Daisy, to say that we can use 'on', but that doesn't mean that all speakers do. Americans do well on tests, while Brits do well in them.

  3. #5

    Re: in or on

    How is it different between "Inclusive" and "included"?


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 283
    #6

    Re: in or on

    To use a preposition about a situation,thing,..., i think , implies more than just language habits. It reflects some deepstructures in language-users' mind and differs from one language to another language and also from one dialect or accent to another ones. does using "on test" mean metaphorically that i imagine that tests are something that have a surface and "in tests" mean that they are something that have a volume? can comparative linguistics be useful? for example in persian one uses a propositin means "in" with "test"
    Last edited by nimsooze; 26-Feb-2007 at 16:26.


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 283
    #7

    Re: in or on

    no idea about using prepositions according to non-linguistic grounds?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
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    #8

    Re: in or on

    Quote Originally Posted by nimsooze View Post
    It reflects some deepstructures in language-users' mind
    Such as what?


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 283
    #9

    Re: in or on

    I mean we model our world according to some paradigms and these paradigms determine many parts of our habits( including language habits). For example, suppose that in language A , one imagine( sometimes unconciously) that a "situation" is like a pool which can plunge him, then he uses a preposition like "in" . but if it seems like a "field" in language B , one uses a preposition like "on". of course this process is more concrete at the beginnings of a language and after that, all of us repeat it without delibration and think that it is all natural.
    ps : there are many things in the world we havent any answer for them




    9


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 283
    #10

    Re: in or on

    any opinion ?

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