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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Help Me!!! Teacher

    Would you like to help me about sentences

    What is the meaning sentences below:
    1. Would you like to come to the party tonight
    2. Would you like to go to the party tonight

    Please, please, ... answer ... teacher

    Regards

  2. Harry Smith's Avatar
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      • Armenian
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    #2

    Re: Help Me!!! Teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Suherman View Post
    Would you like to help me about sentences

    What is the meaning sentences below:
    1. Would you like to come to the party tonight
    2. Would you like to go to the party tonight

    Please, please, ... answer ... teacher

    Regards
    The first sentence is pronounced by someone who is the organiser of the party. The second can be pronounced by someone who isn't the organiser.
    Mind the difference between "come and go"

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #3

    Re: Help Me!!! Teacher

    That's an excellent example, Harry. It's not always the case, though.

    The verbs "come" and "go" are deictic. They tells us where the speaker', is situated in space. For example,

    Max: Come to my house. I am at home.
    Max: Come with me to my house. I am not at home.

    In short, Suherman, there are several interpretation for your example sentences.

    Come
    1. Would you like to come (with me) to the [Sam's] party tonight?
    2. Would you like to come to the party (at my house) tonight?
    3. Would you like to come to the party (at Max's house) tonight?

    Go
    1. Would you like to go (with me) to the party tonight?
    2. Would you like to go to the party (at my house) tonight?
    3. Would you like to go to the party (at Max's house) tonight?

    Note that, the person doing the inviting doesn't have to be the person having the party; "come" and "go" tell us where the speaker's physical body OR thoughts are at the time. For example, Max doesn't have to be at home when he says, "Come to my house." He could be out at a restaurant and inviting you to "come along with". Additionally, Max doesn't have to be at home when saying, "Would you like to come to the party tonight?". Max could mean "come along with me" to another location.

    As for "thoughts", consider this. Max is at home on the phone with you: "Would you like to come to my friend's party tonight?" Aside from the meaning "come along with me" there's this one: Max is not at his friend's house at the time of speaking, but Max uses "come". Why, because Max's thoughts are there - at the party that will take place that night.)

    All the best.

  4. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Help Me!!! Teacher

    Nice explanation! Someone who knows the difference between come and go won't be mistaken, I think.

  5. Newbie
    Interested in Language
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    #5

    Re: Help Me!!! Teacher

    Excellent explanation.

    Thanks...teacher.

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