Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. Unregistered
    Guest
    #1

    Unhappy relfexive pronoun

    what is reflexive pronoun use. Is it good or bad?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,815
    #2

    Re: relfexive pronoun

    It's fine when it's correct. Use them for emphasis (I did it myself) or where a verb can affect the speaker or another (I hurt myself). Don't use them as object pronouns (he spoke to myself) or in verbs that are commonly reflexive in European languages (I shaved myself)- there are very few truly reflexive verbs in English (pride, steel).

  2. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #3

    Re: relfexive pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    It's fine when it's correct. Use them for emphasis (I did it myself) or where a verb can affect the speaker or another (I hurt myself). Don't use them as object pronouns (he spoke to myself) or in verbs that are commonly reflexive in European languages (I shaved myself)- there are very few truly reflexive verbs in English (pride, steel).
    I had to think a while to make sense of this:
    ...truly reflexive verbs in English (pride, steel).
    So I think maybe a couple of examples would help:

    He prided himself on his roses. [He took pride in the roses he grew.]

    He steeled himself for the argument.[He got ready for it - not in the sense of rehearsing his arguments, but in the sense of preparing himself for the effort.


    b


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 52
    #4

    Re: relfexive pronoun

    The use of 'reflexive' pronouns is changing in a manner, guys, that is almost certainly not addressed in the texts that you. For example, many native speakers say things like: 'I will give them to yourself.' There is no point in arguing that it's 'wrong.' It's praxis.

    Mark in Perth

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Iraq
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2005
    • Posts: 1,198
    #5

    Re: relfexive pronoun

    Let me Tdol sum up:
    1. Emphasis (I did it myself)

    2. Where a verb can affect the speaker or another (I hurt myself). The object and the subject are the same person.

    3. Don't use them as object pronouns (he spoke to myself)
    Not as an object but maybe as a subject: Myself and two other people

    4. In verbs that are commonly reflexive in European languages (I shaved myself)- there are very few truly reflexive verbs in English (pride, steel).

    True this is a bit of a problem as it is not clear whether myself is used for emphasis or because the verb is reflexive. Tdol could please mention those reflexive verbs in English you can think of:
    help yourself

    Still the reflexive is necessary to show who does the action:
    The barber shaves those who don't shave themselves

    5. Sometimes myself can be substituted by "on my own":
    Im did it (by) myself (I did it on my own)

    6. Not after prepositions of place except when the reflexive meaning makes sense:
    He is pleased with himself
    Last edited by Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim; 23-Feb-2007 at 15:28.

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #6

    Re: relfexive pronoun

    Welcome, mark in perth.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,815
    #7

    Re: relfexive pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by mark in perth View Post
    The use of 'reflexive' pronouns is changing in a manner, guys, that is almost certainly not addressed in the texts that you. For example, many native speakers say things like: 'I will give them to yourself.' There is no point in arguing that it's 'wrong.' It's praxis.

    Mark in Perth
    I don't agree with that in full. Obviously, the form exists, but it would simply be marked wrong in an English language exam, so I would not teach it as being a form to use in the same way as the others. It is a disputed usage to many and is an error in many contexts. It would not be acceptable in any formal text, so there is a point in disputing its correctness such contexts. By all means tell them about it, but also within the context of where it is acceptable and where it is not.


    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    #8

    Re: relfexive pronoun

    What about
    Children, wash yourselves at once and come to dinner.

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #9

    Re: relfexive pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    What about
    Children, wash yourselves at once and come to dinner.
    It's an imperative sentence, right? (You) wash yourselves...

  5. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: May 2010
    • Posts: 1
    #10

    Re: relfexive pronoun

    It was mentioned about true reflexive verb like steel and pride. I known also "availe of" and absent. Is there any others like this? Could someone give me a full list of this verbs or just a link couse I can't find it anywhere.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Exception to the rule? Omission of relative pronoun
    By Federerexpress in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 23-Jan-2010, 14:57
  2. "Hu," from "human," as a pronoun
    By Mike Epstein in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 26-Nov-2007, 08:49
  3. The missing possessive pronoun
    By mitzeljh in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 24-Feb-2007, 17:53
  4. pronoun reference or pronoun agreement
    By asheleylenae@yahoo.com in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-Sep-2006, 19:51
  5. pronoun
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Nov-2004, 11:26

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •