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  1. cacao
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    #1

    Red face i have a quetion

    First of all, I'm sorry that I'm not good at English.
    I'm learning about english grammar.
    I learend ditransitive verb.
    ==Subject+Ditransitive verb+indirect object+direct object
    This form can be chaned
    ==Subject+verb+direct object+Preposition+indirect object
    And this Prepositon depends on the verb.
    ex. I give her a flower --> I give a flower to me.
    I bought her a bike --> I bought a bike for me.
    I have a quetion.
    In verb "bring" ,which preposition is correct?
    I learned bring uses "to". But, Both are correct?
    ex. I bring her a cup of coffee. --> I bring a cup of coffee to her.
    I bring a cup of coffe for her.
    Also, is there meaning difference in two sentences?
    I wonder...........
    please.... could you answer me that? .........

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: i have a quetion

    [1] I will bring her a cup of coffee.
    => she receives the coffee.

    [2] I will bring a cup of coffee to her.
    => she is the goal; she is where the coffee will go.

    [3] I will bring a cup of coffee for her.
    => she benefits from my action; I will do it for her.

    In the end, she benefits from all three. She gets a coffee.

    All the best.


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 52
    #3

    Re: i have a quetion

    Hi, Cacao. Patience: I am still learning how to post -- but I can answer your question:

    When you say, 'I bring a cup of coffee TO her,' the preposition 'to' indicates direction. When you say, 'I bring a cup of coffee FOR her,' the preposition 'for' indicates that the coffee is for her to drink -- possession.

    Also, I am not sure that 'bring' is a good example of a ditransitive. I think of a ditransitive as a verb that BY ITS NATURE needs TWO objects: 'give,' for example -- anything that you do give must be given TO someone. 'Name,' for example -- you must always name some thing: I named my cat 'Bruce.'

    However, 'bring' is not NECESSARILY ditransitive. It's ditransitive in the sentence, 'I brought a bike for myself' because you must buy the bike for someone; but I don't think it's ditransitive in 'I bring coffee TO her' because 'her' is not Who the Coffee Is For but Where the Coffee Is Going.

    Hmmm . . . would anyone else like to weigh in here?

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    #4

    Re: i have a quetion

    Quote Originally Posted by mark in perth View Post
    the preposition 'for' indicates that the coffee is for her to drink -- possession.
    For is pupose not possession even if possession is implied. That's why for can mean "because".

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #5

    Re: i have a quetion

    Quote Originally Posted by mark in perth View Post
    When you say, 'I bring a cup of coffee FOR her,' the preposition 'for' indicates that the coffee is for her to drink -- possession.
    Benefactive more likely. "The fact that a possessive relationship is usually implied follows automatically from the fact that what is received is normally subsequently possessed. (source_)"

    In this dialogue Max brings the coffee. Max does it instead of Pat, in Pat's place, for Pat. The word benefactive expresses an act done in place of someone else. (Note that, It doesn't mean, beneficial or that Pat benefits from Max's actions;e.g., He stole the money for her and she went to jail.)

    Pat: I need to get a cup of coffee.
    Max: Don't get up. I'll bring it for you. <Pat does not posses the coffee>
    Pat: I also need to give Sam this letter.
    Max: I've already given it for you. <Pat does not possess the letter>

    Quote Originally Posted by mark in perth
    Also, I am not sure that 'bring' is a good example of a ditransitive. I think of a ditransitive as a verb that BY ITS NATURE needs TWO objects
    Right. There's a difference between double-object constructions (DDC) and prepositional object constructions (POC). Both are ditransitive. Bring works as a DDC if it has a <theme> and a <recipient>.

    Ex: I'll bring you a coffee. <recipient> Double-Object Construction
    Ex: I'll bring a coffee to you. <goal> Prepositional-Object Construction

    Those two examples do not share the same meaning. The first sentence isn't a shorter version of the second sentence. (That is, "to you" wasn't semantically incorporated.) They are two different and unrelated structures. This is evidenced by ditransitive verbs like "donate":

    Ex: They donated money to the church.
    Ex: They donated the church money. <ungrammatical>

    List of ditransitive verbs: Ditransitive Verbs

    This is a HUGE topic. Hope to get a good discussion going.

    All the best.

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