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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    churn

    Please tell me the meaning of the word "churn" in the follwing:

    The civil war brought with it a various need for uniforms, which not only got the American factory system churning but introduced standard body-size measurements to the ready-to-wear industry.


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    #2

    Re: churn

    The pressure to produce enough uniforms forced the factories into frantic production.

    "Churn" is derived from the method by which butter is made - the milk being turned over and over until the butterfat solidifies. It has the image of continual movement.


    • Join Date: Nov 2006
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    #3

    Re: churn

    Dear Sr.

    I think that it means stamp something in production line. Once I've read "churn out a book" as a sardonic expresion.

    Hector Albino.

  2. queenbu's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: churn

    churn out, to produce mechanically, hurriedly, or routinely: He was hired to churn out verses for greeting cards.
    dictionary.com

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: churn

    Quote Originally Posted by Albino View Post
    Dear Sr.

    I think that it means stamp something in production line. Once I've read "churn out a book" as a sardonic expresion.

    Hector Albino.
    Quote Originally Posted by queenbu View Post
    churn out, to produce mechanically, hurriedly, or routinely: He was hired to churn out verses for greeting cards.
    dictionary.com
    Yes, you've got the sense of 'churn out' OK, but Anglika was right about the original use (without the "out"). There was nothing sardonic about the "uniforms" quote, and churn was used there as an intransitive verb. (We know the factories produced uniforms, but not from the grammar of the sentence.)

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 28-Feb-2007 at 23:04. Reason: Added last sentence

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