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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    pitchster

    Would you please tell me what does "pitchster" mean in the following:

    As models strutted down a short runway in colored denim, studded and corduroy hiphuggers, pitchster Molly Sims proclaimed, “They’re not only just low-they’re ultra low.


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    #2

    Re: pitchster

    In this case a fashion journalist whose pronouncements set the tone for the new season.

    Someone who pushes a concept or a fashion in order to bring it to the attention of the market.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: pitchster

    Often the suffix "-ster" (in a noun) implies baseness or triviality: huckster, gangster, punster, shyster. I've never met 'pitchster' (outside this thread) so don't know whether it has similar connotations. Are a pitchster's pronouncements trivial, I wonder....

    b

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: pitchster

    PS

    I've remembered a couple more examples: mobster and trickster. Of course, this isn't always true of nouns that end '-ster'; sister, youngster, master and roster are untainted. But I think when it's used as a productive suffix (a bit that's added onto words to make new words) it tends to have negative overtones.

    b

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