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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    Cool the meanings of "duff"

    hi, i came accross the word in tv series. the situation is : a father asked his son to try the new motorbike.
    the original sentence is "come on, plant that duff up"

    my question is what is the meaning of duff here? does it refer to buttocks?


    • Join Date: Sep 2005
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    #2

    Re: the meanings of "duff"

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    hi, i came accross the word in tv series. the situation is : a father asked his son to try the new motorbike.
    the original sentence is "come on, plant that duff up"
    my question is what is the meaning of duff here? does it refer to buttocks?

    That is one of its meanings, yes, reffering to a kind of pudding that looks (slightly!) like a buttock.

    It is also a bad swing in golf, and by association anything, including people, that doesn't work very well.

    "He's a duffer. he never gets anything right."
    "My MP3 is duff. I need a new one."

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #3

    Re: the meanings of "duff"

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Whitehead View Post
    That is one of its meanings, yes, referring to a kind of pudding that looks (slightly!) like a buttock.
    ...
    ...And the 'pudding' idea gives us another use of 'duff'. Someone who is pregnant may be referred to (informally) as 'in the pudding club' (or, coincidentally, 'having a bun in the oven' - which I mention only because it's another baking metaphor). That is often abbreviated to 'in the club'; but even less formally she may be described as 'up the duff'.

    b

    PS See more here: Up the duff
    Last edited by BobK; 04-Mar-2007 at 14:02. Reason: PS added


    • Join Date: Sep 2005
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    #4

    Re: the meanings of "duff"

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    ...And the 'pudding' idea gives us another use of 'duff'. Someone who is pregnant may be referred to (informally) as 'in the pudding club' (or, coincidentally, 'having a bun in the oven' - which I mention only because it's another baking metaphor). That is often abbreviated to 'in the club'; but even less formally she may be described as 'up the duff'.

    b

    PS See more here: Up the duff
    Oh yeah! Good one... I had never even thought about that.

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