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  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #1

    Positions of 'also' and 'too'

    Actually, I am having some more questions... I just am not sure if I should or should not ask them in a new thread... They are connected with the position of "also" in a sentence (I believe that isn't that difficult as "only"... At least I hope so!)...

    What is the position of "also" in a sentence?

    E.g.
    1)
    A: I come from NYC.
    B: Me too. (= Can replace "too" with "also" somehow?)

    2)
    I like reading and watching films. Of course, I ALSO like listening to the music.
    (Should I put it in front of the verb or in front of the object? Is it ever possible to put it in front of an object?)
    Reposted on behalf of Lenka, from https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...tml#post157656

  2. Lenka's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: Positions of 'also' and 'too'

    By the way, as I read the sentence again... I think I made a mistake in it (maybe not only one - but I can see only one).
    I ALSO like listening to the music. <= I should delete the article, shouldn't I?

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    #3

    Re: Positions of 'also' and 'too'

    In a grammar book, It reads that also is to be found just before the verb, after be or after modals whereas too is placed at the end of the clause or sentence. However, I collected examples in which also begins the sentence :
    Also, Mike and I had never crossed the ocean.:
    or in the structure where too is customarily expected
    It is my secret, and John's also. It may be an answer to your question.
    Alain
    Just a question Is not so do I more suitable than me too ?

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Positions of 'also' and 'too'

    Quote Originally Posted by CHOMAT View Post
    In a grammar book, It reads that also is to be found just before the verb, after be or after modals whereas too is placed at the end of the clause or sentence. However, I collected examples in which also begins the sentence :
    Also, Mike and I had never crossed the ocean.:
    or in the structure where too is customarily expected
    It is my secret, and John's also. It may be an answer to your question.
    Alain
    Just a question Is not so do I more suitable than me too ?
    Swan mentions the possibility of putting 'Also' at the beginning of the sentence, to emphasize the 'newness' of the idea expressed. An even more emphatic way of doing this is to put 'What's more' at the beginning of the sentence:

    Also, I'd like to add that...'

    I'm very pleased to be here. What's more, I'm proud...


    You can't use 'too' in this position.

    Swan also cites a usage of 'too' before the verb.

    I like meat. I also like fish. ['also' refers to the object here]

    Harry likes meat. I, too, like meat.['too' refers to the subject here]

    Swan says this position marks a 'formal or literary style', but I don't think it's that formal. A general point that Swan makes seems to me to be more important:
    When we speak, we show the exact meaning by stressing the word or expression that also/ as well/ too refers to.
    AOB:
    Alain: Me too is less formal than So do I, but common in colloquial use.

    Lenka: 'I also like listening to the music' is OK, but it refers to a particular instance: 'When I go to the ballet I'm mainly interested in watching the dancing, but I also like listening to the music'. But in the general sense - of what you like doing as a rule - ''I also like listening to music" [no article].

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 07-Mar-2007 at 11:26.

  4. Lenka's Avatar

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    #5

    Re: Positions of 'also' and 'too'

    I like reading and watching films. Of course, I ALSO like listening to the music.

    Is the sentence correct? Is it possible to say "Of course, I like ALSO listening to the music." ?

    (Should I put it in front of the verb or in front of the object? Is it ever possible to put it in front of an object?)

    Maybe I haven't read all your replies properly (as I can't find an answer for this question), so, if you have answered the question, I am sorry for asking again.



    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    AOB:
    Alain: Me too is less formal than So do I, but common in colloquial use.

    b
    Bob, what does "AOB" mean?

    I have another question which refers to (is "refer to" the right verb here?) the short answers "so do I" etc.

    How should one answer this sentence?

    A: I don't like dogs.
    B (doesn't like dogs either): Neither do I. or I don't like dogs either. or I don't either.

    I suppose not of all the answers I wrote are correct (but I hope at least one of them is ). Which one(s) is/are correct?

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Positions of 'also' and 'too'

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    I like reading and watching films. Of course, I ALSO like listening to the music.

    Is the sentence correct? Is it possible to say "Of course, I like ALSO listening to the music." ?

    ...
    The first sentence is correct (as long as you're referring to the film music - the score, by John Williams, John Barry, Tolga Kashif - someone like that); otherwise, "I also like listening to music". Your second sentence isn't correct. The 'also' could also go at the end of the sentence: 'Of course, I like listening to music also.' ('Too' can go in this position too.)



    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Bob, what does "AOB" mean?

    I have another question which refers to (is "refer to" the right verb here?) the short answers "so do I" etc.

    How should one answer this sentence?

    A: I don't like dogs.
    B (doesn't like dogs either): Neither do I. or I don't like dogs [/them] either. or I don't either.

    I suppose not of all the answers I wrote are correct (but I hope at least one of them is ). Which one(s) is/are correct?
    I asked for that . 'AOB' is an abbreviation used (usually) at the end of an agenda for a meeting. It stands for 'Any Other Business'. I used it as a catch-all term for other things I hadn't dealt with in my main answer.

    'refer to' is OK, but perhaps not as appropriate to this context as 'while we're on the subject of ...'; or just 'I have another question about the short answers "so do I" etc.'

    All three of your alternatives are fine. Colloquially, B might just say 'Me neither'; but in writing, and in all formal contexts (written or spoken) your versions are best.

    b

  6. Lenka's Avatar

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    #7

    Re: Positions of 'also' and 'too'

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I asked for that . 'AOB' is an abbreviation used (usually) at the end of an agenda for a meeting. It stands for 'Any Other Business'. I used it as a catch-all term for other things I hadn't dealt with in my main answer.
    b
    Thank you very much, indeed.

    Anyway, I am afraid that I don't understand the sentence "I asked for that." this time . Does it mean that you could expect I would ask?

    e.g. Your child cries a lot and you tell it to stop crying, otherwise you'll punish it somehow.
    If it doesn't stop crying, you can punish it by not allowing it to watch TV (or watching TV?) and say "You asked for that."

    Can it be used in this sense? I can't think out any other meaning...

  7. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Positions of 'also' and 'too'

    ('not allowing it to watch...' or 'not allowing it to go on watching... ' - the 2nd one assumes that he is already watching TV when he starts crying.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 15-Mar-2007 at 10:27. Reason: Typo fixed - spotted/questioned by Lenka

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    #9

    Re: Positions of 'also' and 'too'

    Can I say "I also do." instead of "So do I."?

  8. BobK's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Positions of 'also' and 'too'

    Quote Originally Posted by dihen View Post
    Can I say "I also do." instead of "So do I."?
    Well you can - it's not wrong. But it sounds stilted, to my ear.

    b

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