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    #1

    Which is the best answer ?

    Hi

    The housekeeper --- for us this weekend, although she usually cleans the house only.

    a] cooks b] is cooking c] has cooked d] will have cooked

    In my opinion both [b] and [c] can be chosen but I have to choose only one answer. Which is most correct and why? Should it be [b]?


    Thank you very much in advance.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Which is the best answer ?

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    Hi
    The housekeeper --- for us this weekend, although she usually cleans the house only.
    a] cooks b] is cooking c] has cooked d] will have cooked
    In my opinion both [b] and [c] can be chosen but I have to choose only one answer. Which is most correct and why? Should it be [b]?
    Thank you very much in advance.
    I agree that either b or c is possible - but c would depend on the housekeeper's having used the freezer:

    The housekeeper has cooked for us this weekend and left a tub of boeuf bourgignonne in the freezer, although she usually only cleans.

    Of course, given a similar context and an absolutely dependable housekeeper, the future perfect is (just) possible too. But this is most unlikely. If required to choose one, I'd choose b.

    b

  2. queenbu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Which is the best answer ?

    I think it depends on whether this is said on Saturday morning or Sunday evening.
    I often meet these ambiguous cases.

  3. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Which is the best answer ?

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    Hi

    The housekeeper --- for us this weekend, although she usually cleans the house only.

    a] cooks b] is cooking c] has cooked d] will have cooked

    In my opinion both [b] and [c] can be chosen but I have to choose only one answer. Which is most correct and why? Should it be [b]?


    Thank you very much in advance.
    I'd vote for "b" and I think there is a kind of fixed arrangement in this sentence which is shown by the second part of the sentence. Look! "Although she usually cleans the house only" shows that she never cooks for them and this weekend she is asked to cook.

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    #5

    Re: Which is the best answer ?

    b] The housekeeper is cooking for us this weekend, although she usually cleans the house only.

    I agree. b] works and here's why. The phrase 'this weekend' expresses the future; i.e., this coming weekend, and 'is cooking' expresses a future plan. That is, it's synonymous with is going to cook. The other choices, specifically a] and c], don't fit. Neither refers to future time, and choice d], while it expresses future time, doesn't fit either because it refers to two actions: an action that will occur in the future before some other action.

    a] cooks <present; habitual>
    b] is cooking <future plan>
    c] has cooked <present perfect tied to the past>
    d] will have cooked <future perfect; connects two events>

    All the best.

  5. queenbu's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Which is the best answer ?

    I'm sorry but I still don't see why 'The housekeeper has cooked for us this weekend,......' doesn't work.I mean, if you're stating this on Sunday evening, when the weekend is not over yet, doesn't it make sense? Of course, if there's only one answer, one would choose 'is cooking' but I don't see why 'has cooked' is totally wrong.

    It's the sort of question I usually post and the answer is often that both are correct. And I'm the one to insist on one answer only, because these things usually crop up in an exercise where you have to choose just one answer.

    See for example https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...mple-past.html
    Last edited by queenbu; 11-Mar-2007 at 16:07.

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    #7

    Re: Which is the best answer ?

    Quote Originally Posted by queenbu View Post
    I'm sorry but I still don't see why 'The housekeeper has cooked for us this weekend,......' doesn't work.I mean, if you're stating this on Sunday evening, when the weekend is not over yet, doesn't it make sense? Of course, if there's only one answer, one would choose 'is cooking' but I don't see why 'has cooked' is totally wrong.
    I see. OK. Let me tackle this from your point of view.

    The adverb 'this weekend' is ambiguous. It could mean,

    1. at some unspecified time during this weekend, in which case it would be compatible with present perfect 'has cooked' or

    2. it could mean this past weekend, in which case it would be compatible with simple past 'cooked' or

    3. it could mean this coming weekend in which case it would be compatible with progressive 'is cooking'.

    In other words, the adverb 'this weekend' takes its meaning from the verb it modifies. If it modifies 'has cooked', it means 1.; if it modifies 'cooked', it means 2., and if it modifies 'is cooking', it means 3.

    Nevertheless, I stand by b] 'is cooking'. I agree with you, though, there's something rather fishy about c] 'has cooked'. (I don't know what it is at the moment, but I will figure it out. Your point of view is beginning to sway me in another direction. That can wait. It's almost 1:00 a.m. here. Yawn.)

    Quote Originally Posted by queenbu
    It's the sort of question I usually post and the answer is often that both are correct. And I'm the one to insist on one answer only, because these things usually crop up in an exercise where you have to choose just one answer.

    See for example https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...mple-past.html
    I see, but you know that spoken language and written language differ, right? The adverb 'recently' signals the present perfect; however, speakers today are merging the present perfect with the simple past. That's why you will find the two work with 'recently'. On an exam, use what you learned in your classroom. Some teachers teach by the book, others accept exceptions. You need to know who your audience is. Furthermore, if an answer doesn't sit well with you, ask and ask again. (It'll get you your answer and...it'll make me a better teacher.)

    All the best.

  7. queenbu's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Which is the best answer ?

    Goodnight


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    #9

    Re: Which is the best answer ?

    Allow me to throw in my two cents in the pot.
    a and b are fine.

    "You can use the simple present tense to express future actions that are scheduled to occur."

    present perfect is not okay. Although it is not inferable from the context whether the speaker refers back to the past but it is a possibility and pp is used to refer to the 'near' past or to actions whose timeframe includes the present, yet I do not think the case in point satisfies any of pp's criterion.
    With 'this weekend,' I do not perceive proximity to the present time.


  8. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Which is the best answer ?

    Quote Originally Posted by svartnik View Post
    Allow me to throw in my two cents in the pot.
    a and b are fine.

    "You can use the simple present tense to express future actions that are scheduled to occur."

    present perfect is not okay. Although it is not inferable from the context whether the speaker refers back to the past but it is a possibility and pp is used to refer to the 'near' past or to actions whose timeframe includes the present, yet I do not think the case in point satisfies any of pp's criterion.
    With 'this weekend,' I do not perceive proximity to the present time.

    Hi, Svartnik!
    I think there is no timetable here. I can see fixed arrangement and that's why I voted for "b". Cheers!

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