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  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 2
    #1

    Get along vs. go along

    Hi,

    I had an interesting discussion with a friend today but we couldn't agree upon it at the end.

    She wrote that she often nags me and I wrote in reply that I had to get along with it (= with the nagging).

    Then she stated that "to get along with" can only be used with persons and that if I wanted to say that I have to tolerate, to bear her nagging I should have written "to go along with".

    I wonder if she was right and if "to go/get on with it" can be used as a synonym in this case.

    Thank you!

    Mat


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #2

    Re: Get along vs. go along

    Quote Originally Posted by rambosv View Post
    Hi,

    I had an interesting discussion with a friend today but we couldn't agree upon it at the end.

    She wrote that she often nags me and I wrote in reply that I had to get along with it (= with the nagging).

    Then she stated that "to get along with" can only be used with persons and that if I wanted to say that I have to tolerate, to bear her nagging I should have written "to go along with".

    I wonder if she was right and if "to go/get on with it" can be used as a synonym in this case.

    Mat
    Hi Mat,

    Your friend is right. It seems that you have to go along with her nagging or you think you have to go along with her nagging in order to get along with her.

    "to go/get on with it" are not synonymous with "to go along with sth".

    "to go on with sth" - continue doing something. "We're not going to make any changes now. We're going to go on with the project as it was first planned.

    "to get on with sth" - To get busy at sth after taking a respite/break. "Okay, that's a long enough break. Let's get on with it or we'll never finish it today like we planned.

  2. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 2
    #3

    Re: Get along vs. go along

    Thank you for the explanation.

    Although the go/get on solution seemed inaproppriate to me for this case, I did not feel competent to oppose it because it was actually proposed by a native speaker from Australia.

    Mat


    Hi Mat,

    Your friend is right. It seems that you have to go along with her nagging or you think you have to go along with her nagging in order to get along with her.

    "to go/get on with it" are not synonymous with "to go along with sth".

    "to go on with sth" - continue doing something. "We're not going to make any changes now. We're going to go on with the project as it was first planned.

    "to get on with sth" - To get busy at sth after taking a respite/break. "Okay, that's a long enough break. Let's get on with it or we'll never finish it today like we planned.

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