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  1. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
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    #1

    any-

    There are two possibilities of how to use words anything/anybody etc. and these are:

    1) in the meaning of "nothing"
    any... + negative verb
    She didn't do anything.

    2) in the meaning "it doesn't matter which/who"
    We left the door unlocked. Anybody could have come in.


    My question is if it is possible to use the second example of usage with a negative verb (like in the meaning it does matter who/which...).

    You can't buy this book anywhere. => 1) You can buy it nowhere.
    You can not buy the book anywhere. => 2) You can buy only in some specialised book shops.

    Am I right? Is it possible to use "any-" also in this way? (By the way, I am not sure, but maybe I should have put the word "also" in the previous sentence in front of "it"... What do you think?)


    Other examples (or "anyother"??):
    Anobody of them isn't clever. => 1) Nobody is clever.
    Anybody of them is not clever. => 2) Not everyone of them is clever - only some of them.

    What about each/every? Are the sentences below correct? I suppose they aren't...
    Each of them isn't clever.
    Everybody of them is clever.

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    #2

    Re: any-

    "You can not buy the book anywhere" doesn’t really mean "You can buy only in some specialized book shops"? The 1st "can't" is essentially your 2nd " can not" (I won’t write it that way however), Your "the" refers to a particular book, but it doesn’t really mean you can buy this ‘particular’ book somewhere like "some specialized book shops."

    The sentence "Anybody of them isn't clever" doesn’t make sense and definitely doesn’t mean "Nobody is clever." Same comment with "Anybody of them is not clever."

    I understand the intended meaning of "Each of them isn't clever" but it doesn’t sound natural. Same comment goes for "Everybody of them is clever."

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: any-

    It's hard to know whether "You can't buy that in any store" means "You can only buy this in specialty store" OR "It's sold out everywhere." You would need to have context.

    That book is selling like crazy. It's impossible to find. You can't find it in any store.
    OR
    Only the most exclusive shops sell it, you know. You can't find it in (just) any store.

  3. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
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    #4

    Re: any-

    Thank you very much - you have explained exactly what I wanted to know...

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    1)That book is selling like crazy. It's impossible to find. You can't find it in any store.
    OR
    2) Only the most exclusive shops sell it, you know. You can't find it in (just) any store.
    Anyway, I believe that is spoken speech it would be easy to recognise what you mean, even without knowing the context... And you can emphasize the word you'd like by italicizing it in a written text as well.

    ad 1) - You can't find it in any store.
    ad 2) - You can't find it in any store.

    Am I right? Or should it be vice versa?

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: any-

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Thank you very much - you have explained exactly what I wanted to know...


    Anyway, I believe that is spoken speech it would be easy to recognise what you mean, even without knowing the context... And you can emphasize the word you'd like by italicizing it in a written text as well.

    ad 1) - You can't find it in any store.
    ad 2) - You can't find it in any store.

    Am I right? Or should it be vice versa?
    I don't think just emphasis (alone) works) - Barb_D's optional 'just' is a common way of underlining the exclusive meaning:
    You can't buy this book just anywhere.
    I'm don't go to this amount of trouble for just anyone.


    Note that the emphasis is on the any- prefix. The emphasis is also on the any in the sentence that means 'there is no place that you can buy this book': You can't buy this book anywhere. The difference comes from two things:
    • Secondary stress on 'can't' [primary stress is on 'any-'] in the 'nowhere' case
    • Insertion of 'just' in the 'exclusive' case


    In positive sentences, you use 'hardly/scarcely/barely' instead of 'just':
    You can't buy it just anywhere=You can buy it hardly anywhere.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 21-Mar-2007 at 16:54.

  5. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
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    #6

    Re: any-

    Thanks.

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