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    #1

    grammar

    Dear teachers,
    Please read the sentence:

    She spoke for the _____ that they three had all lost the _______ to work during the spring break and they needed a good long rest.

    a. team; desire b. group; interest
    c. company; inclination d. gang; intention

    My question is: Can I choose 'b' by regarding 'to work' as the attributive of desire?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: grammar

    In my opinion, b. sounds awkward. The reason being, you lose interest in something, not to something and, moreover, interest, unlike desire, doesn't need a definite article in that context.

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    #3

    Re: grammar

    Dear Cas,

    Is it possible if 'work' is a verb? For example, ' to cooperate' in the sentence' His refusal to cooperate was embarrassing'.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    In my opinion, b. sounds awkward. The reason being, you lose interest in something, not to something and, moreover, interest, unlike desire, doesn't need a definite article in that context.

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Is it possible if 'work' is a verb? For example, ' to cooperate' in the sentence' His refusal to cooperate was embarrassing'.
    To work and to cooperate are verbals, not verbs. They function as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs. This sentence His refusal to cooperate was embarrassing already has a verb: was. The to-infinitive to cooperate functions as an adjective. It modifies the noun refusal. Note that, when a to-infinitive follows a noun, it functions as an adjective; e.g., I have a paper to write. Take a look here, under the heading Infinitives.

    Does that help? Let me know.

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    #5

    Re: grammar


    Dear Cas,
    I think my problem is that I failed to use the correct grammartical term to make myself understood.
    Yes what I meant was whether 'to work' can function as an adjective to modify 'interest'.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    To work and to cooperate are verbals, not verbs. They function as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs. This sentence His refusal to cooperate was embarrassing already has a verb: was. The to-infinitive to cooperate functions as an adjective. It modifies the noun refusal. Note that, when a to-infinitive follows a noun, it functions as an adjective; e.g., I have a paper to write. Take a look here, under the heading Infinitives.

    Does that help? Let me know.

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    #6

    Re: grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post

    Dear Cas,
    I think my problem is that I failed to use the correct grammartical term to make myself understood.
    Yes what I meant was whether 'to work' can function as an adjective to modify 'interest'.
    OK. I see what you mean now. Like this, right?

    Ex: They lost the interest to work.

    The problem, or rather, the solution isn't in the syntax per se, Jiang. It's in the semantics. You lose interest in something and you lose the desire to do something.

    All the best.

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    #7

    Re: grammar


    Dear Cas,
    Thank you so much for your patience. Now I understand your explanation and where I made mistake.
    Many thanks!

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    OK. I see what you mean now. Like this, right?

    Ex: They lost the interest to work.

    The problem, or rather, the solution isn't in the syntax per se, Jiang. It's in the semantics. You lose interest in something and you lose the desire to do something.

    All the best.

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #8

    Re: grammar

    You're welcome.

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