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  1. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
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    #1

    wish clauses: I wish I had / would have

    I don't think I understand the difference between using "would + ..." and past simple in wish clauses... Could someone try to explain it to me, please?

    Which one is correct?

    I wish I had more money. X I wish I would have more money.
    I wish you bought me a ring. X I wish you would buy me a ring.

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    #2

    Re: wish clauses: I wish I had / would have

    I wish I had more money. X I wish I would have more money. This one doesn't work for me- if the two subjects are the same, we generally use 'could', and here the lament is about the lack of opportunity to have more money, so 'would' doesn't work. 'Would' is used to show a refusal or stubbornness.

    I wish you would buy me a ring. This is the form to use- the other person is stubbornly not buying you a ring, and you regret it.


    • Join Date: May 2006
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    #3

    Re: wish clauses: I wish I had / would have

    Hi, Lenka,

    Would in this construction is used when the fulfilment of the wish depends on the will of the person denoted by the subject of the subordinate clause.
    Auntie, I wish you would stay with me for a while.

    If the fulfilment depends more on the circumstances, could or may/might are used.
    I wish I could help you.

    Would also denotes a desire to change the situation.
    I wish I had a cute little dachshound.= It's a pity I haven't.
    I wish someone would give me a cute little dachshound for my birthday.
    In fact this example serves for my first point, too...

    Besides, I think would gives more emphasis.
    Oh, I've found in M.Swan (p.614):
    would expresses regret or annoyance that sth will not happen.
    Everybody wishes you would go home now.
    It can be an order or a critical request:
    I wish you wouldn't drive so fast.= Please don't.
    I wish you didn't drive so fast.= I'm sorry you do.

    Regards
    Last edited by Humble; 20-Mar-2007 at 10:02.

  2. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
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    #4

    Re: wish clauses: I wish I had / would have

    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    It can be an order or a critical request:
    I wish you wouldn't drive so fast.= Please don't.
    I wish you didn't drive so fast.= I'm sorry you do.
    This is really interesting... Thanks for the explanation.


    Just to make sure... If I don't want the sun to shine (which is very unlikely, in my case, but someone may have such a wish) - if I want it to stop shining, what shall I say?
    I would use "would" here, but I am not really sure at all.

    By the way, if I wanted to say "I want the Sun (the planet) to stop "shining".", should I say "I wish it would stop shining" as well?
    What about this: "I wish the Sun didn't shine." - ever, generally

    If I want it to stop raining, shall I say "I wish it would stop raining."?


    • Join Date: May 2006
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    #5

    Re: wish clauses: I wish I had / would have

    Yes, Lenka,
    I think with would these look fine, because emotions are involved.


    • Join Date: Dec 2007
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    #6

    Re: wish clauses: I wish I had / would have

    I still dont understand the diffrence between these:

    I wish you would stay with me.

    I wish you stayed with me.

    (I wish I could understand the difference OR I wish I understood the difference)

    Pls help me

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    #7

    Re: wish clauses: I wish I had / would have

    Quote Originally Posted by tuncayo View Post
    I still dont understand the diffrence between these:

    I wish you would stay with me.I expect you are willing to stay with me, but in fact you won't.

    I wish you stayed with me.I expect you stay with me, but in fact you don't.

    (I wish I could understand the difference OR I wish I understood the difference)

    Pls help me
    not a teacher

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