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    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #1

    pipping their neighbours

    The frequent stoppages meant Bemuda never got going and the Bangladeshi bowlers continued to capture wickets at crucial intervals to have a relatively smooth chance of making it to the Super Eight stages of the World Cup.

    So they did, as Bangladesh batsman Saqibul Hasan struck the winning boundary to formally end India's chance of pipping their neighbours. Mohammad Ashraful was declared the man of the match for steadying the Bangla ship with an unbeaten 29 from 32 balls.

    Please explain the highlighted group of words.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: pipping their neighbours

    pip3
    verb
    • pipped, pipping
      1. To defeat someone narrowly.
    Idiom: pipped at the post
    • colloq
      Overtaken narrowly in the closing stages of a contest, etc.
    Etymology: Late 19c: from pip1 or pip4.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #3

    Re: pipping their neighbours

    Quote Originally Posted by user_gary View Post
    The frequent stoppages meant Bemuda never got going and the Bangladeshi bowlers continued to capture wickets at crucial intervals to have a relatively smooth chance of making it to the Super Eight stages of the World Cup.

    So they did, as Bangladesh batsman Saqibul Hasan struck the winning boundary to formally end India's chance of pipping their neighbours. Mohammad Ashraful was declared the man of the match for steadying the Bangla ship with an unbeaten 29 from 32 balls.

    Please explain the highlighted group of words.
    Anglika has explained 'pipping their neighbours'; the reason it was close enough to be described as 'pipping' is that India and Bangladesh had the same number of league points. Bangladesh came second in their group as they had a higher run-rate than India - and before anyone asks, I don't know what run-rate measures! It's the number of runs scored per hour, or per over, or per wicket taken, or the number of runs scored divided by the number of wickets lost, or some mixture of any or all of these!

    The phrase 'so they did' is hard to understand, because the piece is badly written. That expression should refer back to a main verb, but I think it means 'So they did [make it to the next round]'.

    b

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