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    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 11
    #1

    subjunctive mood

    inspite of indications to the contrary , the politicians ordered that the slums be demolished.

    this sentence an odd to me . it seems wrong . whats the meaing ?

  1. #2

    Re: subjunctive mood

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare View Post
    inspite of indications to the contrary , the politicians ordered that the slums be demolished.

    this sentence an odd to me . it seems wrong . whats the meaing ?

    Hi Nightmare (I have to ask: why "nightmare"?..is English a nightmare??)

    Anyway,
    "order" is one of the subjunctive verbs (as you seem to know) and in the noun clause that follows a subjunctive verb ("that the slums be demolished") the verb is given in the simple or "base" form; in this case: "be".
    Most grammar texts and I'm sure a few websites (maybe this one?) give lists of "subjunctive verbs".

    Good luck


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 1,740
    #3

    Re: subjunctive mood

    Do you mean the above sentence is in `subjunctive mood'?

    I learned that subjunctive mood expresses unreal statements.
    e.g. If I were you, I would fight.
    I wish we had demolished this building.

    But the above sentence (inspite of...........demolished) seems to be a fact.
    I think this sentence is in `indicative mood'

    If I am wrong, please explain me.

  2. #4

    Re: subjunctive mood

    Quote Originally Posted by user_gary View Post
    Do you mean the above sentence is in `subjunctive mood'?

    I learned that subjunctive mood expresses unreal statements.
    e.g. If I were you, I would fight.
    I wish we had demolished this building.

    But the above sentence (inspite of...........demolished) seems to be a fact.
    I think this sentence is in `indicative mood'

    If I am wrong, please explain me.
    Yes, Gary, there is what I have also heard called a "subjunctive" mood or form in the 2nd conditional (using "were" instead of "was") but this is something else and is also called the subjunctive. It refers to a group of verbs (often "command"-type verbs, but includes others) whose noun clause objects include a "simple form" verb, as in your example.

    e.g.
    I demand (subjunctive verb) that he return (simple/base form verb) the money.

    I insist she call me by my first name.


    In the old TOEFL structure section, this was a popular test question. I'm not sure why it is also called the subjunctive, but it is as far as I know unconnected to the conditional structure. Of course, you only notice it with "he/she" or "I" subjects as well.

    I can't find my verb list, but like I said, many grammar texts list them!

    Hope that clears things up
    Best,
    Fiona

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