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    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 283
    #1

    aporia

    what are different meanings of "aporia" ? is it also a kind of prose art , meaning a writing style?


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 283
    #2

    Re: aporia

    no help?


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #3

    Re: aporia

    aporia

    /pori/
    noun an irresolvable internal contradiction in a text, argument, or theory

    OED

    Dictionaries are very useful things


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 283
    #4

    Re: aporia

    I knew that Anglika and I knew too that dictionaries are usefull.What I meant was the less familiar meaning (my second question)


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #5

    Re: aporia

    Don't see where you get the concept of a writing "style". There is nothing in any of the sources I have consulted to indicate writing methods. It is a term to express a conflict/doubt arising from incompatible views of a subject.

    If a cancer patient is advised (a) to have surgery, (b) not to have surgery but to have chemotherapy and (c) to have neither but to have radiotherapy, he or she ends in a state of aporia.


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 283
    #6

    Re: aporia

    Thank u anglica!
    In Shorter Oxford Dictionary , I found this definition:
    (rhet.) a figure : doubt .
    what it means?


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #7

    Re: aporia

    (rhet.) a figure : doubt >> as used in rhetoric: a doubt (a much more concise way of saying an irresolvable internal contradiction in a text, argument, or theory)


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 283
    #8

    Re: aporia

    Then, it is a figure of speech? And can a writer use it ,intentionally , to say something?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
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    • Join Date: Mar 2007
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    #9

    Re: aporia

    It's certainly not a common word. I'm a pretty well-read native English speaker (American) and I've never heard it before. So be careful of your audience if you do use it.

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