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    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #1

    to be form of verbs

    Why it is said that `to be' form of verbs are (is, am, are, was, were)?

    Could anyone explain me on this?

    or

    I mean everyone say (is/am/are/was/were) are `to be' form of verbs?

    But I couldn't understand why it is said so?

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    • Join Date: May 2005
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    #2

    Re: to be form of verbs

    The verb 'to be' is called a copula, or copular verb. It acts as an equal sign to link a subject to words describing it. That is why it is also called a 'linking verb.

    'To be' is an irregular verb and is conjugated in the following manner:

    I am a teacher. (first person singular present)
    We are teachers. (first person plural present)
    You are a teacher. (second person plural or singular present)
    He (she or it) is a teacher. (third person singular present)
    They are teachers. (third person plural present)

    I was a teacher. (fps past)
    We were teachers. (fpp past)
    You were a teacher (sp past)
    He was a teacher (tps past)
    They were teachers (tpp past)

    I, you, he, they, will be [a] teacher[s]. (all forms of future tense)

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