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  1. #1

    who/which

    They volunteer to work in a charity group_____ help the flood victims.
    a) which
    b) who
    I chose 'which' but don't know why my book said it as "who"

  2. #2

    Re: who/which

    Anybody?

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #3

    Re: who/which

    A charity group can be viewed as a group of people. They, who,...

    Correction
    They volunteered to work in/with a charity group that/who helps flood victims.

    Note, in formal writing that is restrictive, which isn't - at least in North American English. Moreover, why wasn't that a choice?

    All the best.

  4. #4

    Re: who/which

    Thanks Casiopea, about the charity group , why don't we consider it as "people formed as a group" and use "help" instead of "helps"?

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #5

    Re: who/which

    Notice how the noun phrase charity group is modified, a charity group. The noun group is singular.

    Singular: A charity group helps.
    Plural: Charity groups help.

    All the best.

  6. #6

    Re: who/which

    But I once read in a document, if you consider "group" as " the number of people participate in that group" so that will be : help?
    How about the sentence bellow:
    The army ______ very strong. They can force the terrorist to get out of the building.
    Is or Are?

  7. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #7

    Re: who/which

    Try an example with singular a. It's specified for number, grammatically, whereas the is not specified for number. It can modify a singular or plural noun.

    Ex: A book is on the shelf.
    Ex: A book are on the shelf. <number agreement: A...are>

    Ex: The book is on the shelf.
    Ex: The books are on the shelf.

    Ex: The team is
    Ex: The team are
    Ex: A team of people are <people is the subject>
    Ex: A team of people is <a team is the subject>
    Ex: A team are <a team is the subject>

    Ex: A charity group of people that help <people that help>
    Ex: A charity group of people that helps <a group that helps>
    Ex: A charity group that helps <a group that helps>
    Ex: A charity group that help <a group that helps>

    If you wanted, you could assume the phrase of people has been omitted, thereby accommodating a plural verb, like this,

    Ex: A charity group (of people) that help

    There are problems, though. You'll have to assume that every reader gets the ellipsis and, moreover, that they know people, not a group is the subject of the verb help. Otherwise, your readers will assume the sentence is ungrammatical.

    Note that, with phrases like a team of (X of Y), it's the X, not the Y, that's generally considered the subject, the word that agrees in number with the verb. That's not always the case, but it's the benchmark. These days speakers are adopting a different strategy wherein Y is made to agree with the verb (e.g., a team of people are...), but notice that the subject is present, visible, not omitted from the structure. In your example the subject is implied, omitted, not visible. You can argue it's there, yes, but then you have to contend with your readers. What do they see? How do they interpret the sentence? Yours is a great supporting example for why languages have a standard.

    All the best.

  8. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #8

    Re: who/which

    By the way, you could have the following, shown below, where singular 'a group' renames the plural pronoun 'They':

    Ex: They are a charity group that help...

    That example is structurally different from yours, though.

    All the best.

  9. #9

    Re: who/which

    Yes, that really helps, thanks Casiopea

  10. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #10

    Re: who/which

    It does? OK. Glad to help.

    All the best.

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