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    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #1

    take on

    Chappell and India captain Rahul Dravid were among the first to make their way into the BCCI headquarters. They were followed by tour manager Sanjay Jagdale. All three were to offer their take on the World Cup failure and the bigger problems that confront Indian cricket.

    What does phrasal verb `take on' means in thsi paragraph?

    Could anyone explain please?

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: take on

    It's not a phrasal verb. Somebody's take on something is somebody's opinion about something.

    ~R

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: take on

    Hi Gary,
    Although "take on" is a phrasal verb, meaning to attempt something challenging, that's not how this is used.

    Your "take" on something is your view, your opinion, or your thoughts.

    All three were to offer their opinions on the topic of...

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