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  1. Noego's Avatar
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    #1

    Really stumped on this one

    Would I be correct to say that relative clauses:
    ü modify a noun or a pronoun
    ü Are either defining or non-defining
    In the following sentence:
    “She gave me one of the flowers which she was holding.”
    The relative pronoun “which” could be omitted because flowers is the object of the relative clause.
    In the following sentence:
    “The book comes with a CD ROM which includes additional exercises.
    Which cannot be omitted because CD ROM is the subject of the relative clause.
    The two previous sentences are both relative defining clauses.
    In the following sentence:
    “Whichever party wins the election, income tax is likely to rise in the near future.”
    The reason why “whoever” wouldn’t be acceptable, grammatically speaking, is because one out of a limited number of parties will win, thus the use of whichever.
    In the following sentence:
    “He climbed up Mount Brecon, from whose peak he could see three countries.”
    I don’t understand why the answer is “from whose”
    According to my book, whose is used to:
    When we talk about something belonging or associated with a person, animal or plant.
    Not the sentence above, Mount Brecon is neither a person, an animal or a plant, it’s a mountain. Why is “whose” the correct answer??

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: Really stumped on this one

    Would I be correct to say that relative clauses:

    Modify a noun or a pronoun
    => What kind of pronouns?

    Are either defining or non-defining

    In the following sentence:
    “She gave me one of the flowers which she was holding.” The relative pronoun “which” could be omitted because flowers is the object of the relative clause.
    => Yes, but there's a better answer: which conjoins two clauses. >

    In the following sentence:
    “The book comes with a CD ROM which includes additional exercises.
    Which cannot be omitted because CD ROM is the subject of the relative clause.

    The two previous sentences are both relative defining clauses.
    => I was wondering where the commas went. Now, if that is the case, which heads a defining clause (and it can indeed do that - but it's not common in American English) my question is, are you using which as a synonym for that? If so, why? What are your reasons for doing so?>

    In the following sentence:
    “Whichever party wins the election, income tax is likely to rise in the near future.”The reason why “whoever” wouldn’t be acceptable, grammatically speaking, is because one out of a limited number of parties will win, thus the use of whichever.
    => In a way, yes, but there's a much simpler answer; hint: Which one of these functions as an adjective in that sentence, whichever or whoever?>

    In the following sentence:
    “He climbed up Mount Brecon, from whose peak he could see three countries.”I don’t understand why the answer is “from whose”
    According to my book, whose is used to: When we talk about something belonging or associated with a person, animal or plant. Not the sentence above, Mount Brecon is neither a person, an animal or a plant, it’s a mountain. Why is “whose” the correct answer??
    => The definition should read, associated with a person or a thing. A mountain is a thing.

    All the best.

  3. Noego's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • French
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      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
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    #3

    Re: Really stumped on this one

    Thanks a lot, very useful.

    Thanks for all your help, seriously. I really appreciate it.


  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #4

    Re: Really stumped on this one

    You're most welcome.

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