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  1. angliholic's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile gut, inestine, bowel

    Believe it or not, the swallowable camera-in-a-pill crawls around your gut, anchoring itself by biting onto the walls of your intestine, snapping thousands of pictures as it makes its way slowly through the narrow track, giving doctors a look at a suspicious lesion.

    First, I presume gut, bowel, and intentine are interchangeable, right?
    Second, how would I interpret biting into here in other words?
    Third, I think lesion can be replaced by desease, but is it often used?

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: gut, inestine, bowel

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Believe it or not, the swallowable camera-in-a-pill crawls around your gut, anchoring itself by biting onto the walls of your intestine, snapping thousands of pictures as it makes its way slowly through the narrow track, giving doctors a look at a suspicious lesion.

    First, I presume gut, bowel, and intentine are interchangeable, right?
    Second, how would I interpret biting into here in other words?
    Third, I think lesion can be replaced by disease, but is it often used?
    The bowel holds faeces. The intestine is a tube. I think gut has a specific meaning, that might include the intestine: check in a medical dictionary. The plural, "guts" is used colloquially to refer to all that stuff (stomach, pancreas, appendix, intestines, duodenum, possibly also the bowel).

    I don't understand the 'biting into'; it sounds a bit destructive - usually, if something bites into the stomach lining it's a bad thing (the beginning of an ulcer). Perhaps the camera just 'latches on' to the stomach lining.

    A lesion might be the sign of a disease, but it's not the same as a disease. The word is used frequently by doctors, but not much by the rest of us (except people who watch too many hospital dramas )

    b

  3. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: gut, inestine, bowel

    A lesion is a cut or an open wound, like an ulcer.

    Gut is a slang term that can either refer to your stomach, or your entire digestive tract ("I'm getting a bad feeling in my gut about this situation"), or even all your internal organs as a group ("I hate his guts!")

    I think instead of biting into, they would've been better to say "latching onto." Instead of a capsule that justs glides its way through the digestive system, researchers are developing a camera pill that will stop at "points of interest" and attach itself to, say, the wall of the intestine, in order to get some good photos of the trouble area.

    After food is digested in the stomach, it moves through the small intestine (or small bowel), which is where most of the nutrients from the food are abosorbed. Then the food progresses to the large intestine, or colon. The large and small intestine together are also referred to as the "bowels."

  4. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: gut, inestine, bowel

    Oops, I see Bob already answered while I was typing. Fast fingers, that BobK.

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