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    #1

    more than; should etc.

    Dear teachers,

    I have three questions to ask:

    No.1
    People often think that Americans are mroe informal while Europeans are more conservative, yet people of all types live on ______ of the Atlantic.
    a. both sides b. each side
    The key is 'a'. Could you please explain what's wrong with 'b'?

    No.2
    He is one of those people who ______ more than can be done.
    I don't understand the grammar of the italicized part. Should the sentence be 'who promised something more than it can be done'?

    No.3
    Should they cease advertising, prices would be significantly reduced.
    If I use 'if' then the sentence should be: If they ceased advertising....
    In other words, if I want to omit the word 'if' then I should put 'Should' at the beginning of a sentence. Is that right?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Last edited by jiang; 14-Apr-2007 at 04:07.

  1. Philly's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
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    #2

    Re: more than; should etc.

    Hi Jiang
    .
    1. 'Both' is better since the sentence talks about two sides. 'Each' could theoretically be a reference to twenty different sides (for example).
    .
    2. I would use 'promises' rather than 'promised'. Other than that, I have no problem with the sentence. You don't need the words 'something' or 'it'.
    .
    Look at the following versions of your sentence. The words in parentheses are not necessary -- but I think they will help you understand the construction:
    .
    He is one of those people who promises more than can be done. =
    He is one of those people who promises (to do) more than anybody can do. =
    He is one of those people who promises (to do) more than can be done (by anybody).
    .
    3. Yes, you can use 'should' instead of 'if', and you can also do it this way:
    Should you fail this exam, you will have to repeat the course. =
    If you fail this exam, you will have to repeat the course.
    .
    Note: subject/verb inversion is necessary when you use this type of sentence.

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    #3

    Re: more than; should etc.

    &
    Dear Philly,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand No.2 and No.3.
    As to No.1 since we have the word 'Atlantic' I don't know in what way can it refers to twenty different sides. Could you please explain more?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.
    Jiang


    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    Hi Jiang
    .
    1. 'Both' is better since the sentence talks about two sides. 'Each' could theoretically be a reference to twenty different sides (for example).
    .
    2. I would use 'promises' rather than 'promised'. Other than that, I have no problem with the sentence. You don't need the words 'something' or 'it'.
    .
    Look at the following versions of your sentence. The words in parentheses are not necessary -- but I think they will help you understand the construction:
    .
    He is one of those people who promises more than can be done. =
    He is one of those people who promises (to do) more than anybody can do. =
    He is one of those people who promises (to do) more than can be done (by anybody).
    .
    3. Yes, you can use 'should' instead of 'if', and you can also do it this way:
    Should you fail this exam, you will have to repeat the course. =
    If you fail this exam, you will have to repeat the course.
    .
    Note: subject/verb inversion is necessary when you use this type of sentence.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #4

    Re: more than; should etc.

    each determiner & pronoun every one of two or more people or things, regarded and identified separately.

    It can be used to refer to more than two things.

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    #5

    Re: more than; should etc.

    Dear Anglika,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. I am sorry I can't express my idea clear. Could you please explain what's wrong with it if 'each side' refers to more than two? And did you mean here 'each side' might mean 'only on one side'?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    each determiner & pronoun every one of two or more people or things, regarded and identified separately.

    It can be used to refer to more than two things.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #6

    Re: more than; should etc.

    No, I think I am trying to say that in your example "each" could equally well have been used for the answer.

    However, "each" does not necessarily indicate only two sides. It could mean any number, depending on the context. It can never mean only one side.

  2. Philly's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
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    #7

    Re: more than; should etc.

    Hi Jiang
    .
    In my original post I wrote that 'both' is the "better" choice for your first sentence. I wouldn't say that 'each' wrong, but in the context, I think 'both' is better because it clearly refers to only two.

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    #8

    Re: more than; should etc.

    Dear Philly,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    Hi Jiang
    .
    In my original post I wrote that 'both' is the "better" choice for your first sentence. I wouldn't say that 'each' wrong, but in the context, I think 'both' is better because it clearly refers to only two.

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    #9

    Re: more than; should etc.

    Dear Anglika,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    No, I think I am trying to say that in your example "each" could equally well have been used for the answer.

    However, "each" does not necessarily indicate only two sides. It could mean any number, depending on the context. It can never mean only one side.

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #10

    Re: more than; should etc.

    Both are possible, I agree too. However, the sentence is about unity, specifically, a union between the new world and the old world. So, togetherness is the key.

    No.1 (a) People of all types live on both sides of the Atlantic.
    => Both means together. The groups are viewed as united. They make up a collective whole.

    No.1 (b) People of all types live on each side of the Atlantic.
    => Each means separate. The groups are viewed as separate. They make up two collective wholes.

    Hope that helps.

    All the best.

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