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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 4
    #1

    Post Either/neither

    After I thought I had it clear, suddenly a question came to me and I'm not sure which is the right answer to that.
    It's about the use of either and neither. In the following sentences are these expressions used the right way?

    1. Mary drank neither wine nor beer.
    2. Mary didn't drink neither wine nor beer. (or should I say: Mary didn't drink either wine or beer?)

    As I understand neither combines two negative ideas while either indicates a choice between two alternatives. In the example above I mean she didn't drink wine and she didn't drink beer either. I feel I'm so close to the answer and yet I'm not sure. Please, help me.

    Thanks in advance.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: Either/neither

    Quote Originally Posted by yes.one View Post
    After I thought I had it clear, suddenly a question came to me and I'm not sure which is the right answer to that.
    It's about the use of either and neither. In the following sentences are these expressions used the right way?

    1. Mary drank neither wine nor beer.
    2. Mary didn't drink neither wine nor beer. (or should I say: Mary didn't drink either wine or beer?)

    As I understand neither combines two negative ideas while either indicates a choice between two alternatives. In the example above I mean she didn't drink wine and she didn't drink beer either. I feel I'm so close to the answer and yet I'm not sure. Please, help me.

    Thanks in advance.
    Either/or Neither/nor

    1: is fine ; 2: would need "either/or" as the negative is in the verb.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • (Afan) Oromo
      • Home Country:
      • Aaland
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2005
    • Posts: 475
    #3

    Re: Either/neither

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    negative is in the verb.
    I would want to say "on" because I say "in" to means that the verb itself is a negative verb, not just a negated verb.

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #4

    Re: Either/neither

    Dihen, to me, it's on the auxiliary, which is in (or part of) the verb phrase. See, both work.

    All the best.

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