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    #1

    leverage something to

    "The law firm has also leveraged its leading technology mergers and acquisitions practice in the U.S. to global transactions involving China. "

    Can "leverage" be used as transitive verb to be connected with a preposition "to"? Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: leverage something to

    Yes.


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    #3

    Re: leverage something to

    Yes, but probably only in America! There, it seems that you can use it to mean almost anything.

    It is one of the many American business 'buzzwords' but is more commonly just laughed at when American business people try to use it in England.

    eg. 10 years ago a leading British Consultancy was sold to an major American Company. Their CEO came over to talk to all the staff about his plans, but simply couldn't understand why all 200 of them giggled every time he used the word! He used it so frequently that he wrecked the business he'd bought because 180 of the 200 Engineers left the company within weeks and got jobs with firms that better understood the proper use of English!

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    #4

    Re: leverage something to

    No!

    As much as a hate "leverage," it is used to mean "take advantage of," or "capitalize on," but not with "to [a noun]" like that. It needs an infinitive.

    They are leveraging their expertise to make inroads in China, or to further their expansion, or to open channels of communication, etc.

    And Pedant, although it's a buzzword and found silly by many, including me, I think it's a bit of an exaggeration to suggest that it's not proper English.

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    #5

    Re: leverage something to

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    No!

    As much as a hate "leverage," it is used to mean "take advantage of," or "capitalize on," but not with "to [a noun]" like that. It needs an infinitive.

    They are leveraging their expertise to make inroads in China, or to further their expansion, or to open channels of communication, etc.

    And Pedant, although it's a buzzword and found silly by many, including me, I think it's a bit of an exaggeration to suggest that it's not proper English.
    I checked the original and found that my original quote was right. The law firm didn't use an infinitive. Instead they used a noun. That lead me to thinking that probably this is a collocation (leverage...to...).

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    #6

    Re: leverage something to

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    No!

    As much as a hate "leverage," it is used to mean "take advantage of," or "capitalize on," but not with "to [a noun]" like that. It needs an infinitive.
    It is being used by some with a noun:
    "leveraged to" - Google Search


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    #7

    Re: leverage something to

    eg. 10 years ago a leading British Consultancy was sold to an major American Company. Their CEO came over to talk to all the staff about his plans, but simply couldn't understand why all 200 of them giggled every time he used the word! He used it so frequently that he wrecked the business he'd bought because 180 of the 200 Engineers left the company within weeks and got jobs with firms that better understood the proper use of English!
    Marvel at this CEO's guile - he made 180 people leave without any social plan !


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    #8

    Re: leverage something to

    Quote Originally Posted by Francois View Post
    Marvel at this CEO's guile - he made 180 people leave without any social plan !
    No need for a social plan: World leading engineers don't find it too difficult to get employed. He did destroy a very successful mid-sized company though, and lost his parent company a big slice of a niche global market. I'm sure it wasn't all down to him constantly using that word, but it certainly didn't help.

    As for the use of leverage not being proper English, sadly maybe it is accepted now, but it wasn't a normal part of the language before the Americans started using it in the last 20 years or so. It still sounds awful to an English ear, particularly when it comes with the American pronounciation! (leh-verage not lee-verage).

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