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  1. angliholic's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile greif and sorrow

    Mis Hurd was the one who directed my grief/sorrow/sadness and pain into writing....She was the catalyst/agent/medium/too/instrumentimplement that sent me into journalism and indirectly caused all the good thins that came after. But Miss hurd would probably deny this emphatically/clearly/definitely.

    Are all the words beside and in-between slashes interchangeable? Thanks..

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    #2

    Re: greif and sorrow

    They don't all have exactly the same meaning- 'grief', for example, has strong associations with death, which the other two don't, though they can be used to describe the feelings after losing someone. With the last group, I would only use 'emphatically'.

  2. angliholic's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: greif and sorrow

    Thanks, Tdol.
    What about the second group? Are they all equal?

  3. Noego's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: greif and sorrow

    "Miss Hurd was the one who directed my grief/sorrow/sadness and pain into writing....She was the catalyst/agent/medium/too/instrumentimplement that sent me into journalism and indirectly caused all the good things that came after. But Miss Hurd would probably deny this emphatically/clearly/definitely."

    Well it depends on the context. Like Tdol has mentioned, grief is somehow related to death:

    Grief:
    "Very great sadness, especially at the death of someone"

    So if the writer's sadness is related to the death of someone I would consider grief to be unequaled to your other suggestions.

    Sorrow:
    "A feeling of great sadness or regret"

    Sadness (sad):
    "If you are sad, you feel unhappy, usually because something has happened that you do not like."

    I wouldn't say the three are equivalent. The use of sorrow and grief implies a great sadness whereas a bare sadness has a slightly "lighter" sound to it.

    In other words, I think sadness here in this context doesn't evoke a greater sadness like grief and sorrow.

    As for the second group, I wouldn't they're exactly equivalent, but maybe I'm just playing with words. Here's some definitions:

    Catalyst:
    "an event or person that causes great change"
    Stronger connotation than agent.

    Agent:
    "a person or thing that produces a particular effect or change"

    Medium:
    "a method or way of expressing something"
    I think it goes without saying that this one sticks out.

    Instrument:
    "Something that is an instrument for achieving a particular aim is used by people to achieve that aim."

    Hardly as flattering as the other terms.

    Implement:
    "a tool which works by being moved by hand or by being pulled across a surface, but which is not powered directly by electricity or fuel"

    Hum... I think this one is just plain wrong here and can't even be used in this context, as opposed to the other terms.

    As for the last term, I wouldn't see they are equivalent either:

    Emphatically (Emphatic, adj.)

    "done or said in a strong way and without any doubt"

    Clearly:

    "in a way that is easy to see, hear, read or understand"

    Not as strong as emphatically I don't think.

    Definitely:

    "without any doubt"


    In your excerpt, I don't think you could end the sentence with definitely.

    I would say:

    "But Miss Hurd would definitely deny this."

    The same stands with the two other words of your last group, I would put them before the verb deny.

    Hope this helps.

  4. angliholic's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: greif and sorrow

    Thanks, Noego.

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