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  1. #1

    "She is gone" and "She has gone."

    Dear Teacher,

    Would you tell me the difference between "She is gone" and "She has gone."?

    It's a bit confusing.

    Thanks in advance.

    Regards,

    Sweetie

  2. Noego's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "She is gone" and "She has gone."

    I'm really puzzled as to when the use of "she is gone" is proper.

    As far as I know, "she's gone" is only used to talk about someone who is deceased.

    "has gone" is to talk about a place that person went at some point in the past.

    "She has gone to Mexico"

    She left and she is now in Mexico (she's currently in Mexico).

    Hope this helps

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "She is gone" and "She has gone."

    Quote Originally Posted by Noego View Post
    I'm really puzzled as to when the use of "she is gone" is proper.

    As far as I know, "she's gone" is only used to talk about someone who is deceased.

    "has gone" is to talk about a place that person went at some point in the past.

    "She has gone to Mexico"

    She left and she is now in Mexico (she's currently in Mexico).

    Hope this helps
    Yes - 'She is gone' could only be used in a pseudo-archaic or poetic context, to emphasize that what there is is the absence of her; use this form only if you know what you're doing and if you're speaking to people who won't think you're just making a mistake.

    b

  4. #4

    Re: "She is gone" and "She has gone."

    I'm not a native English speaker but I think that I've come across the phrase "She is gone" even if the person in question is not deceased. What about when it is certain, or (very) highly unlikely that she is never coming back to the place where the the phrase is used?

  5. Noego's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "She is gone" and "She has gone."

    Quote Originally Posted by Caorthine View Post
    I'm not a native English speaker but I think that I've come across the phrase "She is gone" even if the person in question is not deceased. What about when it is certain, or (very) highly unlikely that she is never coming back to the place where the the phrase is used?
    You're right. The thing is, is someone is leaving and never coming back, it has that similar connotation of permanent end.


    Example:
    -Where's Katie?
    -She's gone?
    -What do you mean she's gone? Where is she?

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