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  1. #1

    invincible suspicions?

    I've checked every dictionary possible but can't seem to find a good answer to the question below.

    What does the word invincible mean in the following sentences?

    Receive some mysterious communication which would turn his invincible suspicions into a certitude strong enough to provoke action with all its risks?
    -Joseph Conrad, 'The Tale'

    How can suspicions be invincible? Invisible, I could understand, but invincible!?!?


    and

    The Commanding Officer was one of those men who are made morally and almost physically uncomfortable by the mere thought of having to beat down a lie. He shrank from the act in scorn and disgust, which was invincible because more temperamental than moral.
    -Joseph Conrad, 'The Tale'

    In what way can the act of shrinking from something be considered invincible?


    Please help


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: invincible suspicions?

    In both cases it means "immovable/unchangeable".

    Sometimes it's helpful to look at a thesaurus rather than a dictionary : invincible - Synonyms from Thesaurus.com

  2. #3

    Re: invincible suspicions?

    Thanks for the quick response Anglika. I have to think about your suggestions though. None of them translates well into Swedish.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #4

    Re: invincible suspicions?

    Conrad was very fond of big words starting with in-; as etymologically 'invincible' means 'impossible to overcome/vanquish', my suspicion is that somewhere in the context you'll find that someone had tried to persuade the person that his suspicions were unfounded.

    Similarly, the CO's scorn couldn't be undermined.

    b

  4. #5

    Re: invincible suspicions?

    Thank you BobK ... the word[s] to overcome is/are exactly what I was looking for; one of its meanings translates perfectly into Swedish and really hits the spot.

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Conrad was very fond of big words starting with in-; as etymologically 'invincible' means 'impossible to overcome/vanquish', my suspicion is that somewhere in the context you'll find that someone had tried to persuade the person that his suspicions were unfounded.

    Similarly, the CO's scorn couldn't be undermined.

    b

    And you're right, someone had tried to convince him that his suspicions were unfounded, i.e. his second in command.

    Again, thank you very much.

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