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  1. Noego's Avatar
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    #1

    A few more questions...

    thrust: (v.)

    In the following sentence:

    "Another important point is that passionate people are usually those that are thrust into positions of leadership."

    Is "thrust into" a phrasal verb? If so, what does it mean?

    Does it mean "put into"?

    Could I say, if talking a race:

    "He was thrust into first place."

    Could I give this as an example? Would this appropriately represent the meaning of thrust into?

    I'm assuming thrust into is a phrasal verb because according to my dictionaries:

    From Cambridge (for thrust):

    "to push suddenly and strongly:"

    In my previous example, what exactly is the meaning of thrust into?

    Thanks.

  2. Noego's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: A few more questions...

    Would I be right in saying:

    “A leader must have gusto if people are to follow him and achieve the corporate mission.”
    Def.: Corporate means relating to business corporations or to a particular business corporation. (BUSINESS)”
    Here corporate mission means the mission of the company. The objective of the company you are working for.



    Is my explanation correct?

    In the following sentences:

    “You will carry out your plan more carefully and aim for the best results possible.”
    "But most jobs have some elements that are less fun and more difficult to carry out."
    In which other contexts can we use "carry out"?

    I'm not 100% clear on that and I want to be.

    Could I say:

    "He carried out his homework."

    It sounds really weird and I've never heard it before. What is exactly is specified to carry out. Also, I don't "do" is a correct synonym for carry out.

    Could anyone shed some lights on this?

    Thanks.

    willing to:

    I'm not satisfied about the definitions of "willing to" I've found:

    "If someone is willing to do something, they are fairly happy about doing it and will do it if they are asked or required to do it."
    =prepared.

    I don't think prepared and willing have the same meaning at all.

    Look at the following example:

    "I'm willing to give you all of my money to get my wife back!"

    I believe that willing to here is used correctly. But according to the definition, you should be fairly happy about doing it.

    I've heard willing to in plenty of contexts where the person saying it was not happy at all to do it but had to.

    I think this is where the difference between prepared and willing lies.

    Prepared evokes a grim resolution (no happiness involved)
    Willing can also evoke a grim resolution but it could also mean that someone is happy to do something.

    I don't understand why the definitions of willing to that I've found all have a some connotation with being happy to do something.

    What is it that I don't understand here?


    Last edited by Noego; 26-Apr-2007 at 10:51.


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    #3

    Re: A few more questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by Noego View Post
    thrust: (v.)

    In the following sentence:

    "Another important point is that passionate people are usually those that are thrust into positions of leadership."

    Is "thrust into" a phrasal verb? If so, what does it mean?

    Does it mean "put into"?

    Could I say, if talking a race:

    "He was thrust into first place."

    Could I give this as an example? Would this appropriately represent the meaning of thrust into?

    I'm assuming thrust into is a phrasal verb because according to my dictionaries:

    From Cambridge (for thrust):

    "to push suddenly and strongly:"

    In my previous example, what exactly is the meaning of thrust into?

    Thanks.
    "some are born great, some achieve greatness and some have greatness thrust upon them"

    The implication is that something has been forced on someone, despite their resistance/objection. Someone who is "thrust into" a position of responsibility is forced into it by outside forces. I feel that the sentence you have given (passionate people are usually those that are thrust into...) is not in fact correct. Passionate people are usually those who achieve positions of leadership might express it better.

  3. Noego's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: A few more questions...

    I too thought it was really a strange sentence.

    It comes from a book I have to teach so I'm kind of confused as to how explain this...


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    #5

    Re: A few more questions...

    Difficult one! Perhaps could be explained as "thrust (themselves) into" - forced themselves into the position.

  4. Noego's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: A few more questions...

    Yeah, it's a viable explanation.

    The thing is, I don't think anyone is thrust into position of management by being enthusiastic. It's not like you're enthusiastic and one day you're forced to become the president of the company.

    Could be force themselves in the position of leaders. But I think in this context that the writer means that if you have the right attitude the management will notice you and put in you in charge, not the other way around. There's a sentence further down the text that says:

    "This will definitely help you stand out from the crowd and get top management's attention."

    So I think the meaning of "thrust into" here is that the management will promptly give the enthusiastic person the opportunity to be in charge.

    I can't really picture myself explaining the nuance here to Chinese students who have trouble saying "my name is". It's gonna be one tough lesson.

    What about the other questions, can anyone enlighten me please?

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #7

    Re: A few more questions...

    Thrust into as in placed in a position, one you are capable of doing but may not be prepared for just yet.
    carry out
    a.to put into operation; execute: He doesn't have the funds to carry out his design.
    b.to effect or accomplish; complete: They carried out their plan without incident.
    willing to
    Disposed or inclined; prepared: I am willing to overlook your mistakes.
    Does that help at all?

  6. Noego's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: A few more questions...

    It really does.

    Your definition of thrust into sounds really good. I think that's exactly what the author means in this context.

    Is that your interpretation though or does it comes from a source?

    As for your definition of willing to, this is also how I would define it.

    I just don't understand why some many references seem to imply that if you're willing to do something you're happy about doing it. It's just not true.

    Nothing to say about carry out, you've nailed it.

  7. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #9

    Re: A few more questions...

    Your definition of thrust into sounds really good. I think that's exactly what the author means in this context.

    Is that your interpretation though or does it comes from a source?
    Mine.

    As for your definition of willing to, this is also how I would define it.

    I just don't understand why some many references seem to imply that if you're willing to do something you're happy about doing it. It's just not true.
    I agree.

    Nothing to say about carry out, you've nailed it.
    The sources for willing to and carry out are from here.

    All the best.

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