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  1. veer_yodhaa's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
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    #1

    Arrow Severe problem with 'r'

    Hello teachers and friends, Though i am an Indian, i face a very weired problem while pronouncing 'r' in a sentence. for example- 'you are a good teacher' and what i pronounce is ' you aa a good teechu' so here instead of 'are' i say 'aa' i do not spell the 'r' at last, though indian's pronounce 'r' in a trilling manner. and also i have the habit of skipping 'r' may be this because we indians follow queens english (UK English).

    and whenever i tend to spell that 'r' it comes out from my mouth in very trilling format.........i =n the end which does not sound professional.


    Help me out teachers....................
    and also other than teachers....................

  2. Harry Smith's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
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      • Armenia
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 2,932
    #2

    Re: Severe problem with 'r'

    Quote Originally Posted by veer_yodhaa View Post
    Hello teachers and friends, Though i am an Indian, i face a very weired problem while pronouncing 'r' in a sentence. for example- 'you are a good teacher' and what i pronounce is ' you aa a good teechu' so here instead of 'are' i say 'aa' i do not spell the 'r' at last, though indian's pronounce 'r' in a trilling manner. and also i have the habit of skipping 'r' may be this because we indians follow queens english (UK English).

    and whenever i tend to spell that 'r' it comes out from my mouth in very trilling format.........i =n the end which does not sound professional.


    Help me out teachers....................
    and also other than teachers....................
    Try to pronounce it in your throat not in your mouth.

  3. veer_yodhaa's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 20
    #3

    Re: Severe problem with 'r'

    Can u explain it to me in detail that how to pronounce 'r' in throat and not in mouth............
    perhaps any technique to do so.......
    or any exercise.......


    Thank you.............

  4. veer_yodhaa's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 20
    #4

    Re: Severe problem with 'r'

    when i try to spell 'are' from throat itb sounds 'ahhh...' so is this ok.

    'you are a good teacher' becomes 'you ahh a good teacher'
    perhaps i think this the correct pronounciation when tried to do it from throat

  5. #5

    Re: Severe problem with 'r'

    As a non native English speaking person, I would like to draw your attention to the difference between BrE and AmE when it comes to the 'r'-sound, which, naturally, you already are aware of. Most Brits, at least most Englishmen, don't use this sound at all in situations like the one you describe (yes, I know about the linking-r, etc.). One way of practicing the BrE r-sound is to treat it as a vowel, not a consonant (when applicable, of course). You may also try to get hold of a book on phonetics (or check the Internet) - they often have pictures showing the position of the tongue for different sounds.

  6. BobK's Avatar
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      • English
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      • UK
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      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #6

    Re: Severe problem with 'r'

    Not all AmE. Some East Coast accents aren't rhotic either. When my company, then based in Boston Massachusetts, was taken over by a company based in Houston Texas, there were some interesting accent clashes.

    b

  7. veer_yodhaa's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 20
    #7

    Re: Severe problem with 'r'

    Quote Originally Posted by Caorthine View Post
    As a non native English speaking person, I would like to draw your attention to the difference between BrE and AmE when it comes to the 'r'-sound, which, naturally, you already are aware of. Most Brits, at least most Englishmen, don't use this sound at all in situations like the one you describe (yes, I know about the linking-r, etc.). One way of practicing the BrE r-sound is to treat it as a vowel, not a consonant (when applicable, of course). You may also try to get hold of a book on phonetics (or check the Internet) - they often have pictures showing the position of the tongue for different sounds.
    So you mean that the sentence 'you aah a good teacher' is acceptable and is generally in the form of British accent?

    and i would also like to tell you that i speak English in the same manner...

    i have the habit of not pronouncing 'r' in any of the sentence unless it is required to spell, for example- prominent (here it is essential to spell 'r')

    but according to me 'you aah a good teacher' is the correct sentence and is also acceptable worldwide- and also it reflects British accent....

    what do u think.....................? am i correct or wrong?

  8. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Severe problem with 'r'

    Quote Originally Posted by veer_yodhaa View Post
    So you mean that the sentence 'you aah a good teacher' is acceptable and is generally in the form of British accent?
    , sometimes. When it's followed by a vowel sound all BE speakers (except those with a speech impediment or an idiosyncratic accent) pronounce the /r/. In, for example, this ...
    Quote Originally Posted by veer_yodhaa View Post
    but according to me 'you aah a good teacher' is the correct sentence and is also acceptable worldwide- and also it reflects British accent....
    ... you should pronounce the /r/ between the /a:/ and the /ə/.

    A decent dictionary will give you this information. The Collins Cobuild Adv. Learner's..., for example, uses a superscript /r/. This means 'included [in a _British_ English accent] before a vowel sound'.

    b

  9. veer_yodhaa's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 20
    #9

    Thumbs up Re: Severe problem with 'r'

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    , sometimes. When it's followed by a vowel sound all BE speakers (except those with a speech impediment or an idiosyncratic accent) pronounce the /r/. In, for example, this ...

    ... you should pronounce the /r/ between the /a:/ and the /ə/.

    A decent dictionary will give you this information. The Collins Cobuild Adv. Learner's..., for example, uses a superscript /r/. This means 'included [in a _British_ English accent] before a vowel sound'.

    b


    Mr. Bobk Sir, from this whole information i understood that the British/Englishmen spell and pronounce 'r' only when there is a vowel in front of the word, example- you are a good teacher- so here in front of 'are' is 'a' which is a vowel so it is mandatory to pronounce 'r' in the 'are' but in other cases like 'you are not amongst them' so here we can spell 'you aa not amongst us' because there is no vowel in front of 'are' (i hope 'n' is not a vowel... so far)

    So sir, am i right..........?
    from here onwards i will pronounce 'r' only and only when there is a vowel in front of it.............

    but it is mandatory to spell 'r' when a word really needs it to complete its meaning for example- prominent- here i cant skip 'r' and say pominent because it destroys the whole word.........


    am i right once again sir?

    in case if any suggestions or corrections are there please do not hesitate to send it ok........

  10. veer_yodhaa's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 20
    #10

    Thumbs up Re: Severe problem with 'r'

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    , sometimes. When it's followed by a vowel sound all BE speakers (except those with a speech impediment or an idiosyncratic accent) pronounce the /r/. In, for example, this ...

    ... you should pronounce the /r/ between the /a:/ and the /ə/.

    A decent dictionary will give you this information. The Collins Cobuild Adv. Learner's..., for example, uses a superscript /r/. This means 'included [in a _British_ English accent] before a vowel sound'.

    b


    Mr. Bobk Sir, from this whole information i understood that the British/Englishmen spell and pronounce 'r' only when there is a vowel in front of the word, example- you are a good teacher- so here in front of 'are' is 'a' which is a vowel so it is mandatory to pronounce 'r' in the 'are' but in other cases like 'you are not amongst them' so here we can spell 'you aa not amongst us' because there is no vowel in front of 'are' (i hope 'n' is not a vowel... so far)

    So sir, am i right..........?
    from here onwards i will pronounce 'r' only and only when there is a vowel in front of it.............

    but it is mandatory to spell 'r' when a word really needs it to complete its meaning for example- prominent- here i cant skip 'r' and say pominent because it destroys the whole word.........


    am i right once again sir?

    in case if any suggestions or corrections are there please do not hesitate to send it ok........

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