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    #1

    Red face /

    /

    1) Shall I call the above mark as slash?
    __________________________________________________ ___________

    You may have the dishes of chicken rice/ beef pasta/garlic bread.

    2) Does the mark / in the above sentence stand for 'and' or 'or' ?

    __________________________________________________ ____________

    Thanks.

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #2

    Re: /

    This is fun! Click here: Punctuation Marks

    All the best.

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #3

  3. Noego's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: /

    I completely agree.

    Actually all of my friends are slashes.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: /

    Quote Originally Posted by Ju View Post
    You may have the dishes of chicken rice/ beef pasta/garlic bread.

    2) Does the mark / in the above sentence stand for 'and' or 'or' ?

    __________________________________________________ ____________

    Thanks.
    It can be used to mean either, and often signifies unclear thinking. I once saw some advice for a technical writer who had the task of preparing engineers to write documents that users would see. The last item on the list was
    Remove the "/" key from their keyboards.


    b
    PS - You would only call it a 'solidus' in very formal writing, and if you call it a 'virgule' you'll get a blank stare. Most people call it a 'slash', prefixed with back or forward if necessary to distinguish / from \.

  5. Noego's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: /

    BobK, are you entirely sure "virgule" is a synonym for "slash".

    Considering that that in French it means "comma", it sounds terribly, terribly wrong.

  6. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #7

    Re: /

    vir·gule –noun

    1. a short oblique stroke (/) between two words indicating that whichever is appropriate may be chosen to complete the sense of the text in which they occur: The defendant and/or his/her attorney must appear in court.

    2. a dividing line, as in dates, fractions, a run-in passage of poetry to show verse division, etc.: 3/21/27; 3/4; Sweetest love I do not go/For weariness of thee.

    Also called diagonal, separatrix, shilling mark, slant, slash, solidus; especially British, stroke.


    virgule - Definitions from Dictionary.com

  7. Noego's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: /

    Well you don't say!

    That is SO odd considering that in French "virgule" is a comma.

    Wow, it's the like the Twilight Zone all over again.

  8. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #9

    Re: /

    Its orgin branches:

    virgule
    thin sloping line, used as a comma in medieval MSS, 1837, from Fr. virgule, from L. virgula "punctuation mark," lit. "little twig," dim. of virga "shoot, rod, stick." The word had been borrowed in its L. form in 1728.

    Online Etymology Dictionary

  9. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #10

    Re: /

    Quote Originally Posted by Ju View Post



    2) Does the mark / in the above sentence stand for 'and' or 'or'?
    According to this blog, words / myth / ampers & virgule,
    A virgule is a slanted line (/) used to separate two words. Virgule is the French word for comma, and one of the uses of the mark is to replace a comma. That’s how it’s used in two places in the title of this blog. It is also used to replace the word or, as in “and/or,” which means, literally, and OR or.
    All the best.

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